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Archive By Section - Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part I

While discussing GMO crops, this column alluded to pesticide resistance as a potential problem with GMO traits such as glyphosate (Roundup ®) tolerance and resistance to the Bt trait found in crops such as corn and cotton. Last week, Barton County ANR Extension Agent shared a column on herbicide resistance from Extension Agronomy. But what exactly is resistance? Not necessarily to just pesticides but also crop resistance to something like a disease. And maybe the more important question is how or can it be prevented? Today's column tackles what is pesticide resistance and how does it develop.

August 03, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Maple leaf scorch

Maples are one of the most popular trees in Barton County. They give fabulous color in the fall, interesting bark in the winter, and overall is a good tree for this area. On the K-State Research and Extension list of recommended trees, 4 different varieties of Maple are listed for Central Kansas. So, why do I get so many phone calls about health issues with them? I think it is for a few reasons. First, because they are so beautiful and highly recommended, we have a lot that have been planted over the years in our communities. Second, they are ...

August 03, 2014 | | Agriculture


The ‘Big data’ deal

Some believe "big data" may be the next renaissance in agriculture. Others call it the greatest advance in agriculture since the Green Revolution during the 1940s, '50s and '60s when one of the biggest waves of research and technology spurred the growth of agricultural production around the world. Some compare big data with the biotech revolution.

July 27, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


GMO – A Blessing or a Curse? Finale

Today, after the previous columns briefly describing genetic engineering and GMO traits found in agriculture, it's time to wrap this up. So IS GMO technology a Blessing or a Curse? That is up to the reader to decide based on facts and reasoning. To help let's list the potential benefits followed by the potential pitfalls as objectively as possible.

July 27, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


CEA Agriculture and Natural Resources

There have been several phone calls over the past few weeks about Palmer amaranth (Palmer pigweed). Several producers and local agronomists are noticing that it is not being controlled effectively in places with Glyphosate. I was e-mailed a news release this week that will give some information about what is being observed in the state, especially in Central Kansas at this time. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, you can get a hold of me by phone, email or stopping in the Extension office.

July 27, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


“Women on the Farm” workshop viewed as a success

"It is difficult to make decisions or even know where to start after the death of someone close to you." Speaker D. Elizabeth Kiss, PH.D, KSU told an audience of 30 at the workshop for "Women on the Farm".

July 27, 2014 | Pam Tucker | Agriculture


Kansas wheat meetings and wheat U approach

Wheat harvest has mostly wrapped up and temperatures have increased, so take a few days and cool off at Kansas Wheat's Annual Meeting and High Plains Journal's Wheat U on Aug. 4 and 5 in Wichita. Wheat board meetings will be held on Monday, August 4, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Sedgwick County Extension Office and will include separate and joint meetings of the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers. The Commission meeting is open for interested parties to attend.

July 27, 2014 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


Scientists complete chromosome-based draft of the wheat genome

Several Kansas State University researchers were essential in helping scientists assemble a draft of a genetic blueprint of bread wheat, also known as common wheat. The food plant is grown on more than 531 million acres around the world and produces nearly 700 million tons of food each year.

July 20, 2014 | | Agriculture


Blossom end rot

I have been told all of my life, "Well, this year is unusual" when it comes to weather. In Kansas, I think that adage holds true every year. For 2014, we had one of the driest starts in history followed by one of the wettest Junes in history. The temperatures have been cooler than normal for the most part, but then we have sudden changes where the daily high will be 20 degrees higher or lower than the previous day. When the weather is so up and down, there might be a few problems in your garden. One of the ...

July 20, 2014 | | Agriculture


CRP emergency haying and grazing approved for 44 Kansas counties

Adrian J. Polansky, State Executive Director of the Kansas Farm Service Agency (FSA), announced today that emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acreage has been approved for 44 counties in Kansas effective Wednesday, July 16.

July 20, 2014 | | Agriculture


GMO – A Blessing or A Curse? Part IV

Today's column focuses on herbicide resistant GMO technology and next week the potential up- and down- sides of GMOs. While this focuses on herbicide resistant traits produced through genetic engineering, it should be pointed out many herbicide resistant traits have been obtained through conventional breeding techniques. Let's discuss the trait almost everyone is familiar with – Roundup Ready ® technology.

July 20, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


The white combine calls

Tuesday, June 24 arrived like most mornings in Finney County. The only difference – humidity levels were high and the dew point skied off the chart.

July 13, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Feeding peace

Television, newspapers, magazines and the web are filled with images of starving children – skeleton-like figures crouched like dogs on their haunches while their mothers wail in anguish. Sometimes these pictures from such far-away places as Sudan, Ethiopia or Somalia also include children eating bread, bowls of rice and other staples that may have come from food produced on the fertile land of Kansas farmers and their counterparts across the United States.

July 06, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


GMO – A Blessing or A Curse? Part II

Last week's column described conventional breeding techniques for the production of varieties and hybrids. Today's column delves into genetic engineering. Before tackling that it's important to remember that much of today's crop and livestock in large part remain tied entirely or partially to these "conventional" techniques. And no matter how sophisticated genetic manipulation becomes, we still take the materials into the field.

July 06, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Barton County Fair

It's Fair time again in Barton County! The youth from all of our communities have been working hard on their various projects, and will be displaying them for the community to see. Whether you enjoy photography, artwork, or livestock, there is something for everyone at the fair.

July 06, 2014 | | Agriculture


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Page 16 of 58

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


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