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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Potential Winterkill Across Kansas

As the Kansas wheat crop begins to break dormancy, concerns of winterkill are on the minds of producers. Two sub-zero events this winter with little to no snow cover may have frozen some wheat plants to death.

March 23, 2014 | | Agriculture


The velocity of change: the ‘80s farm crisis, advocacy efforts and its remerging shadow

The last thing Roger Johnson expected when he knocked on the door of a ramshackle house in western North Dakota was to see the curtain part by the long blued barrel of a rifle.

March 23, 2014 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Choose wisely

Deception and exaggeration have characterized the stance some environmental organizations and the mass media's coverage of environmental issues. If we look critically at these issues, however, we can begin to sort out fact from fiction.

March 16, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


School lunches provide healthy whole grains

March is National Nutrition Month, an opportunity to spotlight healthy eating and physical activity messages at home, school and work.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Pruning Deciduous Shrubs

Now that it is the middle of March, many people I know are itching to get outside and do something with their landscape. Since there is still a threat of cold weather, and the soils are still relativity cool, planting is not something that can be done. There are a few chores that you can start taking care of right now, and one of them is pruning some of your deciduous shrubs. Here is a short article from Ward Upham on what plants you can prune now, and a few tips and ideas for you. Happy pruning, and just remember ...

March 16, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


More Than One Type of Drought In Agriculture

Today's column focuses on two types of drought. The first is the one typically thought of while the second may not immediately pop into your mind unless you are in the middle of it. We normally think lack of precipitation when we hear the term "drought" but a more general definition is "a prolonged or chronic shortage or lack of something expected or desired." First, let's discuss drought in terms of rainfall.

March 16, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


NFU Delegates elect Teske Vice-President at 2014 Convention

Delegates at the National Farmers Union (NFU) 112th Anniversary Convention elected Donn Teske, Kansas Farmers Union president, NFU vice president.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Kansas Farm Bureau President to retire in December

After serving on Kansas Farm Bureau's board of directors for 17 years, Ottawa County farmer Steve Baccus has announced he will retire Dec. 3rd. Baccus served as vice president of the organization for five years and has served as president of the organization since 2002.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Roadmap to profitability helps farmers find the hole in their pocket

Richard Wiswall likes numbers. In that he might be an anomaly among farmers, at least where the numbers are concerned. Some of his numbers involve planting rates and seed inventory, tractor hours, and labor costs-categories most farmers are familiar with-but he takes things a step further-okay, many steps further-by calculating, and tracking, almost every facet of his family farm in East Montpelier, Vt. He tallies numbers to an extensive degree; for instance, his greenhouse operation, is broken down by the cost of each flat, the amount of soil per flat, the number of flats filled in an hour, the labor ...

March 09, 2014 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Water plan

Water, a simple chemical compound, has the big and at times complex job of bringing life to the world. Last October, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback issued a call to action to address the need for a 50-year vision for the state's water that meets the needs of all Kansans now and in the future.

March 09, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Western Farm Show

Billed as, nearly everything an agribusiness professional would need or want, this year's 53rd edition of the Western Farm Show lived up to its slogan. More than 20,000 farmers, ranchers, school children, FFA youngsters and urbanites attended the three-day event at the American Royal Complex in Kansas City.

March 09, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Is Planting Season Almost Here?

Trying to successfully predict what a growing season will be like is akin to perfectly filling out a March Madness Bracket. The only difference is you could win a $1,000,000,000 if you have a perfect bracket. The area is already in the second week of March and April is only three weeks away. Thus far the weather has been schizophrenic with cold winning out. But we all know that can change tomorrow. So what are the prospects looking like for timely of planting spring crops? Maybe it's better to ask if it matters as much as ...

March 09, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Research looks at farmers’ decision-making amid challenging conditions in Kansas

The future of agriculture in Kansas could be daunting as global climate change and resource depletion stemming from industrial farming take hold over coming decades.

March 09, 2014 | | Agriculture


New commissioners elected to Kansas commodity commissions

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department of Agriculture Friday announced the result of the elections held for the state's five grain commodity commissions – corn, grain sorghum, soybeans, sunflowers and wheat in districts Four, Five and Six in the central region of the state.

March 07, 2014 | | Agriculture


Lee Borck named 2014 Kansas Stockman of the Year

MANHATTAN – Lee Borck, Chairman of Innovative Livestock Services Inc., was recognized March 6 as Kansas Stockman of the Year at a banquet in Manhattan. The award is presented annually by the Livestock and Meat Industry Council at Kansas State University.

March 07, 2014 | | Agriculture


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Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


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