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Archive By Section - Agriculture


U.S. wheat still a hot world commodity

The U.S. grain marketing system is unmatched and transparent. Yet it can be complicated. This is why U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) maintains 17 offices strategically located around the world to pave the way for U.S. export growth.

August 04, 2013 | Aaron Harries Director of Marketing Kansas Wheat | Agriculture


​Senator Roberts named to farm bill conference committee

WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Senator Pat Roberts, a senior member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, late Thursday night was selected to serve on the conference committee tasked with ironing out the differences in the Senate and House passed Farm Bills.

August 02, 2013 | | Agriculture


Worst ever?

Hundred degree days coupled with 30-40 mile-per-hour winds and little moisture spells crop and pastureland failure for western Kansas. It's like putting the corn and grass in a giant outdoor oven and turning a fan on.

July 28, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Beef Cattle Institute and Kansas Beef Council to host free BQA training sessions

The Beef Cattle Institute at Kansas State University and the Kansas Beef Council are partnering to host seven advanced beef cattle care and health training sessions throughout Kansas during August and September. The beef checkoff-funded sessions will provide beef producers and veterinarians with up-to-date standards and technologies to improve animal welfare and food safety. The training sessions will be led by Dan Thomson, DVM, PhD; Chris Reinhardt, PhD; and Dave Rethorst, DVM; all of the Beef Cattle Institute.

July 28, 2013 | | Agriculture


Trees showing drought stress

With the recent hot weather, more trees in the region are starting to once again show signs of drought stress. Branches are losing their leaves, many trees are showing exit holes from recent borer attacks, and still many more are just dying outright and needing to be removed. All of these signs of tree sickness and mortality are a cumulating of the past several years of hot temperatures, very little rain, and high, hot winds adding to the drying out process. The ground just finally ran out of water, and what resources the trees had to help them through these ...

July 28, 2013 | | Agriculture


Trading places: Teachers take summer school, learn new way of teaching science

Summer school might not be everyone's idea of a good time, but for Kansas teachers, it is opening up their eyes to a new world of wonder -- soybeans.

July 28, 2013 | | Agriculture


Mid-Term Summer Crop Report Card

August will be here shortly and even though the drought persists, conditions are much better than a year ago at this time. The final grade on this year's summer crops comes will be yield and quality. But as everyone in school knows, mid-term grades give you an idea of where you are at. With that in mind, what are the mid-term grades for this year's summer crops?

July 28, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Food innovation is progress

Seems like not a day goes by without a media story on our country's food supply. Some folks have concluded that the best plate may be an empty plate. How else are they going to avoid killer popcorn, monster tomatoes, drug-treated cattle, radioactive chicken or toenail hotdogs?

July 21, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Summer Lull

The wheat is in, the corn is finally tasselling, soybeans and grain sorghum are hanging in there, and it's county fair time. This is traditionally the time of year after wheat harvest where there is/was a lull in the action and farmers would take a break and maybe even a family vacation before work picked up in August. Initial tillage was done and it was a little early to start intensively fertilizing and for final tillage. With irrigation and crop diversification the lull shrank a bit but typically irrigated corn was done flowering about now, sorghum and irrigated ...

July 21, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Fair was a success

These last 2 weeks have been really busy for Extension, and for 4-H especially! In the upcoming week leading up to the fair, we were all busy behind the scenes working hard to ensure that the fair would go seamlessly for all who came out. The 4-H portion of the fair actually begins about a week before the fair does. The previous Saturday, the 4-H dog show and Livestock skillathon were put on, and the Monday before fair time, was when it was the Clothing Members time to shine with the Fashion Review. Wednesday was when the official fair began ...

July 21, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Our turn

Once in a long while all the chips fall the right way and a Kansas farm family raises the best wheat crop it ever had. The Kent Winter family of northwestern Sedgwick County harvested such a crop in late June of this year.

July 14, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Grub problems in lawns

This week, I wanted to share with you all a small excerpt from the Entomology department's newsletter. I have received a few calls about grub problems in lawns, so I felt that this was important to share.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture


Plant pathology department named best in US

The U.S. National Research Council has ranked Kansas State University's department of plant pathology as the No. 1 plant pathology department in the nation.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture


Senators call for emergency CRP haying, grazing

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) last week called for emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands to help livestock producers suffering from sustained and critical drought.

July 13, 2013 | | Agriculture


Natural must be good right?

Many of you have likely heard of the discovery of Roundup Ready® wheat in the Pacific Northwest where no of Roundup Ready® wheat should have been. It created quite a stir and heated up the debate regarding GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) and their safety. The problem here was although this GMO wheat had been developed and deemed safe for consumption; it was shelved, never to be released for production. The primary reason not to release this wheat was purely economic. Much of our domestic wheat production is destined for export, especially in an area like the Pacific Northwest, and many ...

July 12, 2013 | BY VIC MARTIN | Agriculture


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Page 27 of 51

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Trees vs Grass

Many times when I go out on home visits, the homeowners concerns are with trees on their property. One reason for your trees being in distress may very well be your lawn. If your grass, (especially cool season grasses such as fescue) is allowed to grow up to the trunk of your trees, the competition for water and other nutrients may cause your tree to decline in health. Following is a report on research that has been completed by KSU with more information about the grass and tree competition issue many homeowners have faced.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Conclusion

The two previous columns briefly outlined reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century and the results of those changes for the society. Also discussed were the effects these changes had on the practice of agriculture. Now, let's wrap it up and discuss how these changes changed agricultural producers themselves. Please keep in mind these are general trends that don't necessarily mean everyone producing food, fiber, or fuel or that today is bad and a century ago was better or vice-versa..

January 25, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


USDA reminds producers of upcoming Livestock Disaster Assistance Deadline

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reminds livestock producers that the Jan. 30, 2015, deadline to request assistance for losses suffered from Oct. 1, 2011 through Dec. 31, 2014, is fast approaching.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Food gets ‘no respect’

Hype is a word often associated with advertising agencies, public relations firms and spin doctors who attempt to create, change or repair an image. Many people consider hype a dirty word, something to detest.

January 25, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Kansas to host Central Plains Irrigation Conference Feb. 17-18

The 2015 Central Plains Irrigation Conference and Exposition will take place Feb. 17-18 at the City Limits Convention Center, Colby. The popular annual event focused solely on irrigation-related topics is hosted in Kansas every third year. Sponsors include Kansas State University, Colorado State University, the University of Nebraska and the Central Plains Irrigation Association.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas Commodity Classic to be held on Feb. 6, in Manhattan

All Kansas farmers are invited to the Kansas Commodity Classic on Friday, Feb. 6. The Commodity Classic is the annual convention of the Kansas Corn, Wheat and Grain Sorghum Associations, and will take place at the at the Hilton Garden Inn, 410 S 3rd St, Manhattan, Kan., with registration beginning at 7:30 a.m. It is free to attend and includes a complimentary breakfast and lunch; however pre-registration is requested.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


Trade already

With the advent of 2015, there's hope the Obama administration will follow through on its ambitious trade agenda. Leaders on both sides of the Atlantic agree a more open trade partnership makes sense.

January 18, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Tree order forms

A forester once told me that you know a drought is severe if you see Red Cedar trees dying. All around the county, you can see Cedars in tree rows and windbreaks dead and brown. If you are looking to replace your tree row, The Kansas Forest Service offers low-cost tree and shrub seedlings for use in conservation plantings. Plants are one to two years old and sizes vary from 5 to 18 inches, depending on species. Orders are accepted from now through the first full week in May each year, but order early to insure receiving the items you ...

January 18, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part 2

Last week's column briefly discussed some of the reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century. Drivers for change included two World Wars, the Great Depression, economic conditions after WWII, and the Federal Government. One reader pointed out that the column almost painted war as a good thing for agriculture. That wasn't the intent. The fact is the driver for change and the development of new techniques and technologies is typically an event or events forcing and accelerating change. Now, how did events change farming over the last century.

January 18, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: soils sustain life

Many authors have documented the rise and fall of civilizations throughout time. Reasons for this rollercoaster effect are numerous-from human-influenced changes such as conquest, culture or religion, to events that occur in the natural environment including changes in climate or the presence of natural resources, such as soil.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


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