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FFA officers installed at banquet

May 05, 2013 | | Agriculture


Soil Stewardship Week

In 1955, the National association of Conservation Districts began a national program to encourage Americans to focus on stewardship. Stewardship Week is officially celebrated from the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in May. It is one of the world's largest conservation-related observances.

May 05, 2013 | | Agriculture


Small raised garden

Do you have a small backyard? Do you wish you had the space for a garden, but don't want to sacrifice your entire yard to be able to grow your favorite vegetables? Well, an option for you is to garden is a small raised bed. When you garden in a raised bed system, one of the most important things to consider is the soil that you are going to use. One of the major reasons that smaller spaces have better production than larger gardens is that a person adds the soil mix or potting mix so it will have ...

May 05, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


The Law of the Minimum

There isn't much to say regarding the wheat crop right now but to wait so let's go in a different direction this week. First, the Crop Protection class at the college toured the area south of the college this past Wednesday travelling as far south as the Hudson area. Normally they can examine wheat, alfalfa, and newly emerged corn. Since the weather went south pretty quickly, the tour was a bit abbreviated. It's safe to assume they didn't find any corn emerged or even germinated. The alfalfa seemed to be doing alright and was recovering well ...

May 05, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


K-State Research and Extension Announces Lesser Prairie-Chicken Meeting

Pheasants Forever is helping to publicize a meeting for landowners interested in learning more about the potential listing of the lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) as a threatened or endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This issue has been on the minds of western Kansas landowners for the last two years. A final decision is expected from USFWS in September of this year, but there is still plenty of uncertainty about what that ruling will mean for area producers. This uncertainty causes many concerns for land managers. In order to address some of those, Kansas Department of ...

April 28, 2013 | | Agriculture


The family that eats together stays together

When we think of eating a meal today, images of a person dashing toward the door while chomping down the last bite and yelling good-bye, is an all too common picture. But again, that is only part of the story.

April 28, 2013 | John Schlageck Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


What is Mother Nature thinking?

They say that April showers bring May flowers. The question on everybody's mind right now is what do April ice storms bring? This year, for three weeks in a row, this region has experienced temperatures well below freezing with ice and snow adding to the problems. After two severe drought years the good news is we finally are receiving some moisture. The wheat fields may be growing slow, and look promising as of now, but how much more of Mother Nature's changing moods can it handle?

April 28, 2013 | | Agriculture


Spring Crops and Winter Canola

After the last blast of winter this week, we have had three extremely cold, hard freeze events in about two weeks. By the middle of next week at the latest the damage from this last freeze on the developing head should be apparent. Most of the attention has focused on wheat but where are we concerning our spring planted crops? Let's tackle the easy ones first.

April 28, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Preserve the land

Forty three years ago, when folks in the USA celebrated the first Earth Day, I was stationed in Stuttgart, West Germany – the country was still divided then. Back then I had little opportunity to carry signs that championed the abstract idea of protecting something as vast as our planet. Heck, I didn't even hear about Earth Day until I returned a couple years later.

April 21, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Weather, What’s Normal, and Spring Planting

No one can argue our weather has been boring in 2013. Many find these spring reminders of winter unusual to say the least. The area and most of Kansas has experienced two hard freezes combined with freezing precipitation over the last two weeks. This stands in sharp contrast with the winter/spring seasons common during much of the 2000s. The K-State weather station at the US 281 and US 50 junction reported a high temperature of 4l° F and a low of 34° on Thursday April 18. Friday, April 19, had a low in the mid-20s.

April 21, 2013 | | Agriculture


NRCS announces Drought Recovery Initiative in Kansas

U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) continues to work to provide as much relief to drought-impacted producers as possible. NRCS State Conservationist Eric B. Banks announced the agency will assist producers through a new Drought Recovery Initiative. NRCS will use two application cutoff dates for the initiative: May 17 and June 21, 2013.

April 21, 2013 | | Agriculture


NRCS announces Water Quantity and Drought Pilot opportunity in Kansas

In response to the drought faced by Kansas producers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is providing financial and technical assistance in a new Water Quantity and Drought Pilot funded through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) announced Eric B. Banks, State Conservationist. While NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis, NRCS will use two application cutoff dates for this pilot: May 17 and June 21, 2013.

April 21, 2013 | | Agriculture


Specialist has wealth of knowledge

This week, I have been in Manhattan for New Agent Training and it was wonderful to meet and to learn from the experts in their various fields. One person I had the pleasure to meet was Ward Upton. He is a specialist for the Horticulture Department with a wealth of knowledge about his subject. This week, I thought that I would share a couple of his pieces from the most recent Horticulture newsletter. I hope you find them as informative as I did.

April 21, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Hazardous occupation

Farming is a dangerous business. In fact, farming is one of the most dangerous jobs in the US. Every year, around one hundred youth are killed in farm work related activities. A lot of these deaths could have been prevented with better safety practices. Every year, Barton County, K-State Extension and Research provides a class in Hazardous Occupations Training to teach youth ages 13-18 about the Hazards of farm work, and how to create a safer working environment. Even though the class if offered for a larger age range, it is required for individuals 14-15 years old who will be ...

April 14, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Nine Lives and Winter Wheat

Wheat farmers in Kansas joke that wheat has nine lives and you don't produce a crop unless at least eight of them have been used up before harvest. While this may sound a bit like gallows humor, there is a lot of truth in this statement. The wheat crop here is exposed to the extremes of our weather for nine months while crops like corn, soybean, and sorghum for approximately four. One of the hazards continually on the minds of wheat producers is a late freeze. Before the wheat joints in the spring, the growing point of the plant ...

April 14, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


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Articles by Section - Agriculture


Help Wanted – Careers in Agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 17, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summer safety

Before long, kids will toss their schoolbooks and pencils in the far corners of their rooms, don their Magellan garb and embark on a summer course of outdoor exploration.

May 17, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Study: Spring heat more damaging to wheat than fall freeze

A team of researchers including a Kansas State University professor has released results of a study that measures the effects of climate change on wheat yields, findings that may have implications for future wheat breeding efforts worldwide.

May 17, 2015 | | Agriculture


Help wanted – careers in agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


Wheat plot

This year's wheat crop has had to have nine lives in order to survive to this point. The stressors for this year's crop have been many including: winter-kill, drought, insects, various rusts, and mosaic diseases. The rains came late as well, leaving the wheat shorter than normal. Even though the wheat is short, and many issues have been against it, the wheat still has a chance in many places to make a decent harvest. The individual wheat varieties are responding in various ways to the different stressors that have been present this year. This is one major reason ...

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


Clinton J, Hammeke joins Membership of American Angus Association

Clinton J. Hammeke, Great Bend, is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


NRCS extends comment period for Agricultural Conservation Easement program interim rule

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller recently announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will extend the deadline to provide public comment on the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program's (ACEP) interim rule until May 28.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Drought’s Over, Right?

The last part of April and the beginning of May certainly brought a change in the weather pattern. An unsettled weather pattern with heavy rains, hail, strong winds and even tornados brought much needed moisture and as this is written the end of this week is looking unsettled. As is common with this pattern, while most all areas received rain, totals have ranged from around an inch or less to close to ten inches for some. On average it appears most of the area two to three inches or more. This helps but the area is still under the average ...

May 10, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Boomin’ times

Being one of the early Baby Boomers there's plenty to talk about in my lifetime that's lasted into its sixth decade. During this wonderful, turbulent time my generation has been praised and pummeled.

May 10, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


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