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Archive By Section - Agriculture

Fair was a success

These last 2 weeks have been really busy for Extension, and for 4-H especially! In the upcoming week leading up to the fair, we were all busy behind the scenes working hard to ensure that the fair would go seamlessly for all who came out. The 4-H portion of the fair actually begins about a week before the fair does. The previous Saturday, the 4-H dog show and Livestock skillathon were put on, and the Monday before fair time, was when it was the Clothing Members time to shine with the Fashion Review. Wednesday was when the official fair began ...

July 21, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture

Our turn

Once in a long while all the chips fall the right way and a Kansas farm family raises the best wheat crop it ever had. The Kent Winter family of northwestern Sedgwick County harvested such a crop in late June of this year.

July 14, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture

Grub problems in lawns

This week, I wanted to share with you all a small excerpt from the Entomology department's newsletter. I have received a few calls about grub problems in lawns, so I felt that this was important to share.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture

Plant pathology department named best in US

The U.S. National Research Council has ranked Kansas State University's department of plant pathology as the No. 1 plant pathology department in the nation.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture

Senators call for emergency CRP haying, grazing

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) last week called for emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands to help livestock producers suffering from sustained and critical drought.

July 13, 2013 | | Agriculture

Natural must be good right?

Many of you have likely heard of the discovery of Roundup Ready® wheat in the Pacific Northwest where no of Roundup Ready® wheat should have been. It created quite a stir and heated up the debate regarding GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) and their safety. The problem here was although this GMO wheat had been developed and deemed safe for consumption; it was shelved, never to be released for production. The primary reason not to release this wheat was purely economic. Much of our domestic wheat production is destined for export, especially in an area like the Pacific Northwest, and many ...

July 12, 2013 | BY VIC MARTIN | Agriculture

Sweltering in the ‘dog days’ of summer...Bring on the rain

In case you hadn't noticed, much of the state may already be mired in the "dog days" of summer. You might be thinking, it's too early for such hot temperatures, but think again.

July 07, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture

Agricultural flight demonstration underscores benefits and economic impact of unmanned aircraft

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will have a significant impact on Kansas' precision agriculture industry and overall economy, according to elected officials, academics and industry leaders speaking at a press conference today. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) joined leaders at Kansas State University and Michael Toscano, president & CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), to launch a flight demonstration of numerous UAS used to enhance the care of crops, livestock, pasture and rangelands. Sen. Moran and Toscano also delivered remarks on the significant economic growth and job creation potential of UAS in Kansas.

July 07, 2013 | | Agriculture

Where Did the Wheat Come From?

The wheat harvest is essentially over. While hardly a bumper crop, the area, especially as you move east had fair to very good yields. So how did we end up with a crop in the midst of an exceptional drought? The obvious answer is the precipitation received, especially after the first of the year, but it's a little more complicated than that. Those fields that missed out on the rains, primarily the western half of the area, had miserable yields so the amount of precipitation certainly mattered. What factors allowed many producers to harvest at least average yields?

July 07, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture

Immigration reform now

The immigration debate has begun in Washington, D.C., and not a moment too soon. It is past time our failed immigration and guest-worker program was fixed.

June 30, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture

Hays soybean farmer honored for service to the biodiesel industry

The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) recently recognized Harold Kraus, Hays, for his outstanding efforts in advancing the biodiesel industry. Kraus has served as the primary representative for the Kansas Soybean Commission (KSC) on the NBB for 12 years and is retiring from the position.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture

Scientists discover gene that gives wheat resistance to deadly wheat stem rust pathogen Ug99

The world's food supply got a little more plentiful thanks to a scientific breakthrough.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture

When Is a Drought Over?

Probably nobody in the Golden Belt is under any illusion the drought is over. As we are well past the halfway point in wheat harvest, yields are all over the map. They tend to be much worse going west from Great Bend and fair to very good as you proceed east. Reports indicate yields less than 20 bushels per acre in western Barton County to some 60 bushel per acre fields in the east. These yields certainly provide a dramatic representation of where the snow and rains fell since the first of the year. Based on 60 bushel wheat, it ...

June 30, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture

Watch for Thrips in your garden after harvest

With wheat harvest almost over for the year, insects will possibly be on the move into your garden. One of the main culprits to watch out for right now is thrips. K-State Research and Extension Entomologist J.P. Michaud says that there is a healthy population of thrips in the wheat fields in the area. With harvest removing one of their food sources, your garden is one place they may go.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture

National Pollinator Week

When it comes to pollinators, Kansas farmers and ranchers are creating habitat to boost their populations and harness these critters' value. With National Pollinator Week beginning today, U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is using the opportunity to promote pollinators, like bees and butterflies. Pollinators provide crucial assistance to fruit, vegetable, and seed crops, but many species are seeing their numbers fall. Agricultural producers across the nation work with NRCS to create ideal habitat for pollinators and increase populations in simple and significant ways.

June 23, 2013 | | Agriculture

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Articles by Section - Agriculture

Kansas Forage and Grassland Council Annual Conference to be held Dec. 15

The Kansas Forage and Grassland Council will hold its Winter Conference and Annual Meeting on Dec. 15, at Kansas Farm Bureau Headquarters, 2627 KFB Plaza ...

November 24, 2015 | | Agriculture

Why it’s called ‘Turkey Day’

How did the turkey reserve its place on our traditional Thanksgiving table?

November 22, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture

Digging deeper: Study finds High Plains Aquifer peak use by state, overall usage decline

A new Kansas State University study finds that the over-tapping of the High Plains Aquifer's groundwater beyond the aquifer's recharge rate peaked in ...

November 22, 2015 | | Agriculture

Kansas State University working with state, industry to turn area into pet food industry hub

Kansas State University issued the following news release:

November 22, 2015 | | Agriculture

December programs

As the weather starts to cool down, and the last minute planting and harvesting wraps up for the year, many producers take this time to ...

November 22, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture

Weather Terminology and Facts – Part 3 – Precipitation and History

Today's column concerns precipitation and where the long-term data comes from. First let's tackle precipitation. We aware that it comes in many forms ...

November 22, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture

Make your own plan

The vocation of agriculture began thousands of years ago when the first farmer dug a hole in the soil and planted the first seed. Way ...

November 15, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture

Farmer led committee seeks innovative research proposals

Applications for research projects that can enhance Kansas wheat producers' profitability are currently being accepted by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Wheat Alliance and the ...

November 15, 2015 | | Agriculture

A big disease problem in cattle this fall season: anaplasmosis

This year, confirmed cases of anaplasmosis throughout Kansas and beyond are at some of the highest numbers veterinarians have ever seen. With the high incidence ...

November 15, 2015 | | Agriculture

Fall chores

As a child, you may have fond memories of playing in freshly raked piles of leaves on a crisp fall afternoon. As you get older ...

November 15, 2015 | | Agriculture

Farm Bureau farmers and ranchers to meet in Manhattan

More than 1,000 Farm Bureau members in Kansas will gather in Manhattan Dec. 7-8 for their organization's 97th annual meeting.

November 15, 2015 | | Agriculture

Weather Terminology and Facts – Part 2 – Temperature & Wind

Last week's column focused on humidity. This week focuses on temperature measurements with emphasis on agriculture. However, instead of two parts devoted to this ...

November 15, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


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