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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Kansas State University researchers aim to heighten feed mill biosecurity

They've come a long way already, but Kansas State University researchers studying the safety of animal food produced in feed mills say they've got plenty more to learn as they work to maintain safe food for animals and humans.

November 12, 2016 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


How Plants Sense Their Environment

We think of plants as unsensing and incapable of reacting to their environment. It's true that they don't have a nervous system in the same way higher animals do but they do have mechanisms to cope with challenges and avoid problems. And while they don't possess glands that produce hormones like many animals, they do produce hormones that regulate many functions. Rather than go into them all let's tackle a few ways that plants sense and adapt to their environment. Today's focus is on flowering and how to avoid conditions that would prevent the production ...

November 12, 2016 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


It’s about the residue

Two, three and four decades ago, most farmers took great pride and pleasure in looking across their recently planted fields and seeing green seedlings emerging against a backdrop of black soil. That looked beautiful then. Still does.

November 05, 2016 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Beef Cattle Institute adds resources for Veterinary Feed Directive changes

With a Jan. 1, 2017, deadline looming, veterinarians and producers now have more resources available to help them comply with the Veterinary Feed Directive being issued by the Food and Drug Administration.

November 05, 2016 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Kansas State University scientists gain upper hand on devastating wheat scab disease

Kansas State University scientists say they have isolated and cloned a gene that provides resistance to Fusarium head blight, or wheat scab, a crippling disease that caused $7.6 billion in losses in U.S. wheat fields between 1993 and 2001.

November 05, 2016 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Chores for winter

Even though it still feels like summer outside, it is still time to prepare for winter. Having your lawn mower serviced now will help it run smoother longer and make the busy spring season a little easier. Here are some tips from K-State Research and Extension's horticulture department on getting your tools ready for winter so that they are in top shape next spring.

November 05, 2016 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Weighty Matters In Agriculture

One of the most important factors in agriculture and our everyday lives is something we take for granted until we think it's wrong. Farmers and ranchers in particular, from the time they start every morning until they come in for the evening deal with it. It may make the difference between making or losing money. Consumers deal with it every time they shop for a variety of items. Something that is a somewhat hidden but major factor in our lives – accurate measurements. Whether a weight, a volume, a length or width, or a count – the lives of agricultural producers ...

November 05, 2016 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Look ahead, not back

Proponents of organic, labor-intensive farming contend we should go back to the days when every family owned 40 acres, farmed with hay burners (horses) and applied no chemicals.

October 29, 2016 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Agricultural Conservation Easement Program application deadline set for Nov. 25

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is now accepting applications for the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP). Created under the 2014 Farm Bill, this program provides funding for the purchase of conservation easements to help productive farm and ranch lands remain in agriculture and protect critical wetlands.

October 29, 2016 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Weed control in fall

Every spring, I receive a lot of plants into the office for identification, and for advice on how to control the weed that is invading their lawn. Much of the time these plants are winter annuals or perennial weeds that are too established in the spring to get much control over. If you have dandelions, henbit or chickweed in your lawn, then now is the time to spray and get a better handle on the weeds. I have a short piece from Ward Upham, K-State Research and Extension's horticulture expert that gives you more information about the how's ...

October 29, 2016 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Extension elections

Each fall, the Barton County Extension Council holds an election to fill positions on the four program development committees. Please mark Wednesday, Nov. 2, on your calendar and stop by the Barton County Extension Office at 1800 12th Street to cast your ballot. The ballot box is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Any Barton County resident who is 18 years of age and older may vote in this election.

October 29, 2016 | Bernie Unruh | Agriculture


The Red Wheat Dilemma

As you drive around the area, large piles of grain are plainly evident. The good aspect of this is a decent harvest. The not so good aspect is producers are sitting on a hundreds of millions of bushels and not thrilled about selling with current prices. Something the public may not understand is that while the grain is sitting at the elevator, the producer pays a monthly storage charge for every bushel. One dilemma producers face is that typically high prices mean that they have less to sell while low prices mean the opposite. Of course carryover stocks and world ...

October 29, 2016 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Kansas byway celebrates agriculture

Oct. 6, marked the dedication of the first byway to exclusively celebrate agriculture in this country. Located in far western Kansas and named the "Land and Sky" scenic byway, it follows Highway 27 through Wallace, Sherman and Cheyenne counties.

October 22, 2016 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Lady beetles

they could have been much worse without predators like the Lady Beetle gobbling all that they could. In nature, when food supplies are high, predators produce more offspring, which in turn have their fill of dinner, and also reproduce. The cycle goes on and on until the food source is exhausted. This year, with so many sugarcane aphids as a food source for the Lady Beetle, many more beetles were produced than in previous years.

October 22, 2016 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


USDA informational workshop

The Barton, Rush, Pawnee County Conservation Districts are sponsoring a "USDA Informational Workshop" at 7 p.m. on Nov. 1, at the Wetlands educational Center located on US HWY 156 across from Cheyenne Bottoms.

October 22, 2016 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


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Page 15 of 95

Articles by Section - Agriculture


When winter bites

When the temperatures in Kansas dip below freezing, two types of people usually surface – those who enjoy invigorating weather and those who tolerate the cold ...

December 16, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Weather and Pest Control – Part III

This week will finish our discussion of the effects of weather on pest, specifically weed, control with herbicides. Remember that to combat the Roundup® weed ...

December 16, 2017 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Here we go again

We will finish up the discussion of pests and weather next week. Today, let's take a detour to consider where the area is in ...

December 09, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Christmas tree care

Many people look forward to Christmas time and the smell of a fresh cut evergreen tree can bring back the happy memories of Christmas past ...

December 09, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Kansas Farm Bureau meeting

MANHATTAN - Last week almost 400 Farm Bureau members of Kansas wrapped up business for their farm organization after debating and adopting policy statements for 2018 ...

December 09, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Often forgotten

Think of farmers and ranchers and this old, often forgotten tribute comes to mind. It fits farmers like seed in the soil or ranchers like ...

December 09, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


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