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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Pruning fruit trees

Last week, I shared some information about pruning deciduous shrubs. Well, this week, I found a little information about pruning fruit trees. They are pruned differently than other deciduous trees if you are interested in harvesting them later this year. Here is some advice on how to prune young and established trees to help them grow and produce the best crop that the tree can give.

March 23, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Pest Season Is Near For Winter Wheat

Wheat is greening up in spite of the rollercoaster weather. Producers have been and are busy applying fertilizer and herbicide. Most of the wheat, except for late planted fields looks fair to good. Some areas of winter kill have shown up, nothing widespread but fairly small areas and being a bit more common on the sandier ground. Wheat would typically be closer to jointing now but that isn't necessarily a bad thing as it regards damage from a late season freeze. Aside from needing some timely rain, is there anything else for producers to be concerned about and pay ...

March 23, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Potential Winterkill Across Kansas

As the Kansas wheat crop begins to break dormancy, concerns of winterkill are on the minds of producers. Two sub-zero events this winter with little to no snow cover may have frozen some wheat plants to death.

March 23, 2014 | | Agriculture


The velocity of change: the ‘80s farm crisis, advocacy efforts and its remerging shadow

The last thing Roger Johnson expected when he knocked on the door of a ramshackle house in western North Dakota was to see the curtain part by the long blued barrel of a rifle.

March 23, 2014 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Choose wisely

Deception and exaggeration have characterized the stance some environmental organizations and the mass media's coverage of environmental issues. If we look critically at these issues, however, we can begin to sort out fact from fiction.

March 16, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


School lunches provide healthy whole grains

March is National Nutrition Month, an opportunity to spotlight healthy eating and physical activity messages at home, school and work.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Pruning Deciduous Shrubs

Now that it is the middle of March, many people I know are itching to get outside and do something with their landscape. Since there is still a threat of cold weather, and the soils are still relativity cool, planting is not something that can be done. There are a few chores that you can start taking care of right now, and one of them is pruning some of your deciduous shrubs. Here is a short article from Ward Upham on what plants you can prune now, and a few tips and ideas for you. Happy pruning, and just remember ...

March 16, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


More Than One Type of Drought In Agriculture

Today's column focuses on two types of drought. The first is the one typically thought of while the second may not immediately pop into your mind unless you are in the middle of it. We normally think lack of precipitation when we hear the term "drought" but a more general definition is "a prolonged or chronic shortage or lack of something expected or desired." First, let's discuss drought in terms of rainfall.

March 16, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


NFU Delegates elect Teske Vice-President at 2014 Convention

Delegates at the National Farmers Union (NFU) 112th Anniversary Convention elected Donn Teske, Kansas Farmers Union president, NFU vice president.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Kansas Farm Bureau President to retire in December

After serving on Kansas Farm Bureau's board of directors for 17 years, Ottawa County farmer Steve Baccus has announced he will retire Dec. 3rd. Baccus served as vice president of the organization for five years and has served as president of the organization since 2002.

March 16, 2014 | | Agriculture


Roadmap to profitability helps farmers find the hole in their pocket

Richard Wiswall likes numbers. In that he might be an anomaly among farmers, at least where the numbers are concerned. Some of his numbers involve planting rates and seed inventory, tractor hours, and labor costs-categories most farmers are familiar with-but he takes things a step further-okay, many steps further-by calculating, and tracking, almost every facet of his family farm in East Montpelier, Vt. He tallies numbers to an extensive degree; for instance, his greenhouse operation, is broken down by the cost of each flat, the amount of soil per flat, the number of flats filled in an hour, the labor ...

March 09, 2014 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Water plan

Water, a simple chemical compound, has the big and at times complex job of bringing life to the world. Last October, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback issued a call to action to address the need for a 50-year vision for the state's water that meets the needs of all Kansans now and in the future.

March 09, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Western Farm Show

Billed as, nearly everything an agribusiness professional would need or want, this year's 53rd edition of the Western Farm Show lived up to its slogan. More than 20,000 farmers, ranchers, school children, FFA youngsters and urbanites attended the three-day event at the American Royal Complex in Kansas City.

March 09, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Is Planting Season Almost Here?

Trying to successfully predict what a growing season will be like is akin to perfectly filling out a March Madness Bracket. The only difference is you could win a $1,000,000,000 if you have a perfect bracket. The area is already in the second week of March and April is only three weeks away. Thus far the weather has been schizophrenic with cold winning out. But we all know that can change tomorrow. So what are the prospects looking like for timely of planting spring crops? Maybe it's better to ask if it matters as much as ...

March 09, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Research looks at farmers’ decision-making amid challenging conditions in Kansas

The future of agriculture in Kansas could be daunting as global climate change and resource depletion stemming from industrial farming take hold over coming decades.

March 09, 2014 | | Agriculture


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Page 15 of 51

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Trees vs Grass

Many times when I go out on home visits, the homeowners concerns are with trees on their property. One reason for your trees being in distress may very well be your lawn. If your grass, (especially cool season grasses such as fescue) is allowed to grow up to the trunk of your trees, the competition for water and other nutrients may cause your tree to decline in health. Following is a report on research that has been completed by KSU with more information about the grass and tree competition issue many homeowners have faced.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Conclusion

The two previous columns briefly outlined reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century and the results of those changes for the society. Also discussed were the effects these changes had on the practice of agriculture. Now, let's wrap it up and discuss how these changes changed agricultural producers themselves. Please keep in mind these are general trends that don't necessarily mean everyone producing food, fiber, or fuel or that today is bad and a century ago was better or vice-versa..

January 25, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


USDA reminds producers of upcoming Livestock Disaster Assistance Deadline

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reminds livestock producers that the Jan. 30, 2015, deadline to request assistance for losses suffered from Oct. 1, 2011 through Dec. 31, 2014, is fast approaching.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Food gets ‘no respect’

Hype is a word often associated with advertising agencies, public relations firms and spin doctors who attempt to create, change or repair an image. Many people consider hype a dirty word, something to detest.

January 25, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Kansas to host Central Plains Irrigation Conference Feb. 17-18

The 2015 Central Plains Irrigation Conference and Exposition will take place Feb. 17-18 at the City Limits Convention Center, Colby. The popular annual event focused solely on irrigation-related topics is hosted in Kansas every third year. Sponsors include Kansas State University, Colorado State University, the University of Nebraska and the Central Plains Irrigation Association.

January 25, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas Commodity Classic to be held on Feb. 6, in Manhattan

All Kansas farmers are invited to the Kansas Commodity Classic on Friday, Feb. 6. The Commodity Classic is the annual convention of the Kansas Corn, Wheat and Grain Sorghum Associations, and will take place at the at the Hilton Garden Inn, 410 S 3rd St, Manhattan, Kan., with registration beginning at 7:30 a.m. It is free to attend and includes a complimentary breakfast and lunch; however pre-registration is requested.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


Trade already

With the advent of 2015, there's hope the Obama administration will follow through on its ambitious trade agenda. Leaders on both sides of the Atlantic agree a more open trade partnership makes sense.

January 18, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Tree order forms

A forester once told me that you know a drought is severe if you see Red Cedar trees dying. All around the county, you can see Cedars in tree rows and windbreaks dead and brown. If you are looking to replace your tree row, The Kansas Forest Service offers low-cost tree and shrub seedlings for use in conservation plantings. Plants are one to two years old and sizes vary from 5 to 18 inches, depending on species. Orders are accepted from now through the first full week in May each year, but order early to insure receiving the items you ...

January 18, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part 2

Last week's column briefly discussed some of the reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century. Drivers for change included two World Wars, the Great Depression, economic conditions after WWII, and the Federal Government. One reader pointed out that the column almost painted war as a good thing for agriculture. That wasn't the intent. The fact is the driver for change and the development of new techniques and technologies is typically an event or events forcing and accelerating change. Now, how did events change farming over the last century.

January 18, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: soils sustain life

Many authors have documented the rise and fall of civilizations throughout time. Reasons for this rollercoaster effect are numerous-from human-influenced changes such as conquest, culture or religion, to events that occur in the natural environment including changes in climate or the presence of natural resources, such as soil.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


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