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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Apple in progress

This year, despite a late freeze, looks to be a great year for apples. Everywhere I look, I see branches loaded down with ripening fruit. The heavy loads may cause extra strain on the tree, and as the apples increase in size, the additional weight may be substantial. To help your tree be able to bear this weight, you can use one- inch thick boards to prop up limbs. Cut a "V" on the top edge of the board on which the limb will rest so that it doesn't slip off. Long limbs that are heavily loaded with fruit ...

August 17, 2014 | | Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part III

So what can be realistically be done to deal with pesticide resistance once it happens? When pests develop resistance to pesticides, it is a difficult challenge but in most cases not an impossible one. The key to the effectiveness of these management practices include cost, time, markets and climate. Also remember we are speaking about resistance developing in insects and diseases, not just weeds.

August 17, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Kansas State University equine expert warns traveling livestock owners of vesicular stomatitis

A Kansas State University veterinarian is cautioning residents of Kansas and surrounding states about a highly contagious viral disease that affects horses and livestock - and can sometimes affect humans.

August 15, 2014 | | Agriculture


A special breed

People outside of agriculture routinely try to define the family farm. These same folks have a tendency to question corporate farming whether family owned or not

August 10, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat plot results

As most people know, Kansas is the top wheat producing state in the USA. The first Kansas wheat crop was planted in Johnson County in 1839, since then, the yields farmers are able to harvest have more than doubled. This comes in part from universities and private companies breeding new varieties for better resistance to different pressures including fungal and bacterial. Newer varieties also have heat and drought resistance, which increase yields depending on what variety is planted in a given year. One way these organizations know how a wheat variety will perform is by planting it into a field ...

August 10, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part II

Last week's column described how pesticide resistance develops. Today describes how it can be prevented and next week how to manage it once it occurs. But first a brief review of how this problem arises. For more detail see last week's column.

August 10, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Speak from the heart

Life experiences teach plenty to those willing to learn. From the time I was a small boy, I remember my dad, uncles and grandfather talking and debating the issues of the day whenever we visited one another.

August 03, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


K-State releases new wheat variety

From phonographs to iPods and horse-drawn carriages to four-wheel drives, much has changed dramatically over the last century, the wheat industry included. Kansas State University released its first variety, Kanred, 100 years ago. Now, a century later, K-State, in conjunction with the Kansas Wheat Alliance, is unveiling its latest variety, KanMark.

August 03, 2014 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part I

While discussing GMO crops, this column alluded to pesticide resistance as a potential problem with GMO traits such as glyphosate (Roundup ®) tolerance and resistance to the Bt trait found in crops such as corn and cotton. Last week, Barton County ANR Extension Agent shared a column on herbicide resistance from Extension Agronomy. But what exactly is resistance? Not necessarily to just pesticides but also crop resistance to something like a disease. And maybe the more important question is how or can it be prevented? Today's column tackles what is pesticide resistance and how does it develop.

August 03, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Maple leaf scorch

Maples are one of the most popular trees in Barton County. They give fabulous color in the fall, interesting bark in the winter, and overall is a good tree for this area. On the K-State Research and Extension list of recommended trees, 4 different varieties of Maple are listed for Central Kansas. So, why do I get so many phone calls about health issues with them? I think it is for a few reasons. First, because they are so beautiful and highly recommended, we have a lot that have been planted over the years in our communities. Second, they are ...

August 03, 2014 | | Agriculture


The ‘Big data’ deal

Some believe "big data" may be the next renaissance in agriculture. Others call it the greatest advance in agriculture since the Green Revolution during the 1940s, '50s and '60s when one of the biggest waves of research and technology spurred the growth of agricultural production around the world. Some compare big data with the biotech revolution.

July 27, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


GMO – A Blessing or a Curse? Finale

Today, after the previous columns briefly describing genetic engineering and GMO traits found in agriculture, it's time to wrap this up. So IS GMO technology a Blessing or a Curse? That is up to the reader to decide based on facts and reasoning. To help let's list the potential benefits followed by the potential pitfalls as objectively as possible.

July 27, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


CEA Agriculture and Natural Resources

There have been several phone calls over the past few weeks about Palmer amaranth (Palmer pigweed). Several producers and local agronomists are noticing that it is not being controlled effectively in places with Glyphosate. I was e-mailed a news release this week that will give some information about what is being observed in the state, especially in Central Kansas at this time. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, you can get a hold of me by phone, email or stopping in the Extension office.

July 27, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


“Women on the Farm” workshop viewed as a success

"It is difficult to make decisions or even know where to start after the death of someone close to you." Speaker D. Elizabeth Kiss, PH.D, KSU told an audience of 30 at the workshop for "Women on the Farm".

July 27, 2014 | Pam Tucker | Agriculture


Kansas wheat meetings and wheat U approach

Wheat harvest has mostly wrapped up and temperatures have increased, so take a few days and cool off at Kansas Wheat's Annual Meeting and High Plains Journal's Wheat U on Aug. 4 and 5 in Wichita. Wheat board meetings will be held on Monday, August 4, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Sedgwick County Extension Office and will include separate and joint meetings of the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers. The Commission meeting is open for interested parties to attend.

July 27, 2014 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


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Page 14 of 56

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Help Wanted – Careers in Agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 17, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summer safety

Before long, kids will toss their schoolbooks and pencils in the far corners of their rooms, don their Magellan garb and embark on a summer course of outdoor exploration.

May 17, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Study: Spring heat more damaging to wheat than fall freeze

A team of researchers including a Kansas State University professor has released results of a study that measures the effects of climate change on wheat yields, findings that may have implications for future wheat breeding efforts worldwide.

May 17, 2015 | | Agriculture


Help wanted – careers in agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


Wheat plot

This year's wheat crop has had to have nine lives in order to survive to this point. The stressors for this year's crop have been many including: winter-kill, drought, insects, various rusts, and mosaic diseases. The rains came late as well, leaving the wheat shorter than normal. Even though the wheat is short, and many issues have been against it, the wheat still has a chance in many places to make a decent harvest. The individual wheat varieties are responding in various ways to the different stressors that have been present this year. This is one major reason ...

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


Clinton J, Hammeke joins Membership of American Angus Association

Clinton J. Hammeke, Great Bend, is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


NRCS extends comment period for Agricultural Conservation Easement program interim rule

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller recently announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will extend the deadline to provide public comment on the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program's (ACEP) interim rule until May 28.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Drought’s Over, Right?

The last part of April and the beginning of May certainly brought a change in the weather pattern. An unsettled weather pattern with heavy rains, hail, strong winds and even tornados brought much needed moisture and as this is written the end of this week is looking unsettled. As is common with this pattern, while most all areas received rain, totals have ranged from around an inch or less to close to ten inches for some. On average it appears most of the area two to three inches or more. This helps but the area is still under the average ...

May 10, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Boomin’ times

Being one of the early Baby Boomers there's plenty to talk about in my lifetime that's lasted into its sixth decade. During this wonderful, turbulent time my generation has been praised and pummeled.

May 10, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


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