View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Agriculture


Wheat plot survey

Last week, area farmers met in a wheat field to survey our Extension wheat plot. It is taller than a lot of the stands around the county, but you can still see some of the stress that the frigid winter, cool spring, varying temperatures and overall drought has caused. The difference here is that there were fifteen different varieties to look at and compare all in a row. Every year wheat plots are important to the community in order to help producers make decisions on what seed they will want to plant for the following year. Having several different varieties ...

May 25, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Weather, Climate, and Global Warming – Part 2

Last week's column briefly described weather, climate, global climate, and the atmosphere as a global system redistributing energy received from sunlight due to the tilt of the Earth's axis. Everything naturally moves from a higher to a lower concentration and nature seeks equilibrium or the lowest energy state. Finally, certain gases like carbon dioxide in the atmosphere allow visible light through but don't let heat (longwave radiation) back out. Next a brief description of the what and why of global warming with apologies for the simplification.

May 18, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Livestock handling workshop attracts large, diverse crowd

On Saturday, March 12th, the Kansas Graizers hosted a low stress livestock handling workshop presented by Dr. Lynn Locatelli in Salina Ks. Dr Locatelli is a livestock handling specialist who gave a, deep, thoughtful, presentation to a full-house eager to learn more about low stress livestock handling.

May 18, 2014 | | Agriculture


Protect and enhance

There's an old saying that goes something like this: "Sometimes you have to look back on where you've been to know where you're going." While I'm not a fanatic about history, I believe it certainly has its place in our society today.

May 18, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Evergreen winter damage

This spring, I have had several calls about evergreen trees. People have noticed that their spruce trees are turning brown, usually at the ends of the branches. The question is whether or not this is a disease. In many cases, it is not and is because of the extreme cold temperatures this past winter. The key elements here are timing of damage and location of damage. In terms of timing, the trees were fine last fall and then damage showed up this winter. The location of the damage is at the end of the branches and in a lot of ...

May 18, 2014 | | Agriculture


EPA rule could shut down agriculture

A proposed rule that would expand the regulatory authority of the Environmental Protection and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could bring farming and ranching to a halt. Ordinary field work and everyday chores like moving cattle across a wet pasture, planting crops and even harvest may one day require a federal permit.

May 11, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat plot

Did you know that when it comes to planting wheat, there is a lot of discussion and planning even before it is put into the ground? There are many issues and situations to think about before purchasing and planting a specific variety. At K-State Research and Extension, one of the many projects that we try to do for the community is to find a producer that is ready and willing to have a wheat variety plot on his land. The seed companies for the area including K-State usually donate the seed for the plot while the producer plants the wheat ...

May 11, 2014 | | Agriculture


Weather, climate, and global warming – Part 1

The National Climate Assessment was recently released and it focused on Global Warming and its short and long-term effects. This column isn't intended to change anyone's mind either way on the subject but to provide some information and hopefully make it easier to shift through all the dross out there.

May 08, 2014 | BY VIC MARTIN | Agriculture


Crop specialist explains record number of soybean acres

It's in your margarine, bread, crayons and building materials, but you probably don't realize it. Soybeans are everywhere.

May 04, 2014 | | Agriculture


The Cost of Soil Erosion

This past week was difficult to cope with whether you were a farmer or lived in town. Over five days of wind combined with dry conditions and exposed soil made lives difficult for everyone. As dramatic as the winds and blowing soil were, the 1930s were even worse. The cost of blowing soil included a vehicular death due to poor visibility and numerous accidents. In parts of the state roads were closed and events cancelled. As this is written, the wind has settled down and the skies are blue instead of a hazy brown. Unfortunately there is little chance of ...

May 04, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Wheat Tour estimates lowest production since 1996

The Wheat Quality Council 2014 Hard Winter Wheat Tour wrapped up on May 1. Crop scouts estimated production for the Kansas crop at 260.6 million bushels. This is the lowest tour estimate since 1996. The average yield, calculated from 587 stops, was 33.2 bushels per acre.

May 04, 2014 | | Agriculture


Evergreen damage

Now that spring is in full swing, people have been noticing some dieback or brown areas in their evergreens. I thought I would share an article sent to me by the K-State Plant Pathology department. If you are concerned about your evergreen trees, this piece might help. As always, if you have any questions, please contact me and I will help find an answer to your question.

May 04, 2014 | | Agriculture


Making sense of truck regulations

Once again farmers and ranchers are scratching their heads about how the new CDL (commercial driver's license) regulations will impact them when they transport livestock and crops to market.

May 04, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


May is Beef Month in Kansas

With more than 5.5 million cattle on farms, ranches and in feedyards, Kansas is a recognized epicenter for high-quality beef. To honor Kansas beef producers for this accomplishment, and highlight an industry that generates more than $7 billion in cash receipts each year, Governor Sam Brownback has designated May as Beef Month across the state.

May 02, 2014 | | Agriculture


Adapting To Changing Water Resources

This column isn't about groundwater or irrigation. It's not about building a pipeline from the Missouri River. Today's column is about how area agriculture can maximize the efficiency of precipitation in a climate, which at least in the near term, is short on precipitation. These suggestions have merit, even under more normal conditions.

April 27, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


« First  « Prev  17 18 19 20 21  Next »  Last »

Page 19 of 58

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


1

Page 1 of 1


Please wait ...