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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Wheat Tour’s projection forecasts 288M bushels

MANHATTAN -- The 2015 Hard Red Winter Wheat Tour was full of surprises for participants and led to a sliver of hope for producers statewide. On day three, the participants stopped at 70 fields, an increase from last year's day three total of 45 fields. The daily average was 48.9 bushels an acre, more than an 11 bushel increase from last year.

May 08, 2015 | | Agriculture


Stripe rust

Stripe rust has been found in several fields of wheat in south central Kansas, including Barton County. At the time it was found, it was still at low levels and in trace amounts. With the cool wet weather we have been experiencing, it is something that producers should be on the watch for, and scouting their fields to identify and monitor.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


Time for incentive-based conservation

Farmers and ranchers believe reforms are needed in the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to balance needs of species with economic impacts on agriculture.

May 03, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: Soils clean and capture water

Picture transitioning from a rural setting that includes woodlands, wildlife habitat and farms, to urban areas that consist of concrete, parking lots, streets and buildings. Rural land in a more natural state has the ability to soak up water in the soil more efficiently than urban areas with impervious surfaces that can lead to more runoff.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


What Exactly Is Organic? Conclusion

The last several columns provided general background on the rapidly expanding organic foods market. Today's column briefly outlines conventionally produced foods to highlight the differences between the two. Perhaps the first question to deal with is "Are conventionally produced foods inorganic?"

May 03, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


K-State Research and Extension names Aguilera a 2015 summer intern

Audree Aguilera, a general science student at Barton Community College, has been selected as a 2015 summer intern for K-State Research and Extension.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


Specialty crop growers

Maintaining the rich heritage of agricultural stewardship in Kansas, the Kansas Department of Agriculture has teamed up with DriftWatch, an online mapping tool, to protect the state's specialty crops.

April 26, 2015 | | Agriculture


Nightcrawlers

Lately, I have been getting many calls with people concerned with small mounds in their turf, making it difficult to mow, work or play in their yard. Most of the time, the issue is earthworms that are very active at this time of year. In my research, I came across this short piece of information on nightcrawlers, from the K-State Entomology department. I thought I would share this to give more infomation about these beneficial but sometimes annoying worms.

April 26, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Stockman’s instincts rooted in the heart

Farmer stockmen possess a burning desire to care for their livestock. A few years back, I witnessed this dedication on a dairy in Franklin County.

April 26, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


What Exactly Is Organic? Part 3

This week wraps up the discussion of "organic" foods before comparing them to "conventionally" produced foods. Last week's column briefly described what organic means in general terms. When you purchase a product "Certified Organic" what does that really mean?

April 26, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


USDA Invests $73 million in critical infrastructure projects and assessments to provide public safet

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $73 million to rehabilitate dams across the nation in an effort to protect public health and safety and evaluate the expansion of water supply in drought stricken areas. USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is investing in approximately 150 projects and assessments in 23 states. "Millions of people depend on watersheds and dams for protection from floods and providing clean drinking water," Vilsack said. "By investing in this critical infrastructure, we are helping to ensure a safe, resilient environment for rural America."

April 19, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land – the cultural harvest

Next week marks the 45th anniversary of what many consider the birth of the modern environmental movement. The first Earth Day celebration occurred April 22, 1970.

April 19, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Sidedressing

At this time of year, many gardeners are starting vegetables indoors, or preparing to buy small plants to transplant into their garden when the soil temperature is warm enough. To help with this process, it is sometimes a good idea to give the small plants a little extra fertilizer to help them get a good start. I found a column from the K-State Research and Extension's horticulture department that gives some good advice on transplant solutions and sidedressing to help you give your garden the best start possible.

April 19, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Analyzing summer grazing strategies - understanding and implementing grazing strategies can help max

The Kansas Flint Hills have served as a home and food source for stocker cattle since the mid-1800s, when cowboys drove longhorns up the Chisholm Trail from the southwestern United States to Kansas railways. Flash forward to today: research from Kansas State University on this staple resource could help ensure profitable years ahead for stocker producers.

April 19, 2015 | | Agriculture


Leadership boot camp comes to Hoisington

K-State Research and Extension is offering 4-H Leadership Boot Camp on April 25 in Hoisington, available to all interested persons. Call 785-483-3157 to register. For more information about this, as well as more localized events, check with the local K-State Research and Extension office.

April 19, 2015 | | Agriculture


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Articles by Section - Agriculture


Help Wanted – Careers in Agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 17, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summer safety

Before long, kids will toss their schoolbooks and pencils in the far corners of their rooms, don their Magellan garb and embark on a summer course of outdoor exploration.

May 17, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Study: Spring heat more damaging to wheat than fall freeze

A team of researchers including a Kansas State University professor has released results of a study that measures the effects of climate change on wheat yields, findings that may have implications for future wheat breeding efforts worldwide.

May 17, 2015 | | Agriculture


Help wanted – careers in agriculture

It's graduation season for secondary and post-secondary education. Some graduates are continuing their formal education and many are looking for work. Many are still trying to figure out their career. Too many have never considered agriculture as a career path for a variety of perceived reasons: low wages, poor benefits, they don't hire women, less than desirable working conditions, no experience in agriculture, no jobs, no opportunity for advancement. All of those perceptions are wrong. This column isn't saying there aren't less than desirable jobs in agriculture but these jobs are shrinking as agriculture adapts to ...

May 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


Wheat plot

This year's wheat crop has had to have nine lives in order to survive to this point. The stressors for this year's crop have been many including: winter-kill, drought, insects, various rusts, and mosaic diseases. The rains came late as well, leaving the wheat shorter than normal. Even though the wheat is short, and many issues have been against it, the wheat still has a chance in many places to make a decent harvest. The individual wheat varieties are responding in various ways to the different stressors that have been present this year. This is one major reason ...

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


Clinton J, Hammeke joins Membership of American Angus Association

Clinton J. Hammeke, Great Bend, is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


NRCS extends comment period for Agricultural Conservation Easement program interim rule

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller recently announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will extend the deadline to provide public comment on the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program's (ACEP) interim rule until May 28.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Drought’s Over, Right?

The last part of April and the beginning of May certainly brought a change in the weather pattern. An unsettled weather pattern with heavy rains, hail, strong winds and even tornados brought much needed moisture and as this is written the end of this week is looking unsettled. As is common with this pattern, while most all areas received rain, totals have ranged from around an inch or less to close to ten inches for some. On average it appears most of the area two to three inches or more. This helps but the area is still under the average ...

May 10, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Boomin’ times

Being one of the early Baby Boomers there's plenty to talk about in my lifetime that's lasted into its sixth decade. During this wonderful, turbulent time my generation has been praised and pummeled.

May 10, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


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