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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Kansas State University equine expert warns traveling livestock owners of vesicular stomatitis

A Kansas State University veterinarian is cautioning residents of Kansas and surrounding states about a highly contagious viral disease that affects horses and livestock - and can sometimes affect humans.

August 15, 2014 | | Agriculture


A special breed

People outside of agriculture routinely try to define the family farm. These same folks have a tendency to question corporate farming whether family owned or not

August 10, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat plot results

As most people know, Kansas is the top wheat producing state in the USA. The first Kansas wheat crop was planted in Johnson County in 1839, since then, the yields farmers are able to harvest have more than doubled. This comes in part from universities and private companies breeding new varieties for better resistance to different pressures including fungal and bacterial. Newer varieties also have heat and drought resistance, which increase yields depending on what variety is planted in a given year. One way these organizations know how a wheat variety will perform is by planting it into a field ...

August 10, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part II

Last week's column described how pesticide resistance develops. Today describes how it can be prevented and next week how to manage it once it occurs. But first a brief review of how this problem arises. For more detail see last week's column.

August 10, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Speak from the heart

Life experiences teach plenty to those willing to learn. From the time I was a small boy, I remember my dad, uncles and grandfather talking and debating the issues of the day whenever we visited one another.

August 03, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


K-State releases new wheat variety

From phonographs to iPods and horse-drawn carriages to four-wheel drives, much has changed dramatically over the last century, the wheat industry included. Kansas State University released its first variety, Kanred, 100 years ago. Now, a century later, K-State, in conjunction with the Kansas Wheat Alliance, is unveiling its latest variety, KanMark.

August 03, 2014 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


What Is Pesticide Resistance? Part I

While discussing GMO crops, this column alluded to pesticide resistance as a potential problem with GMO traits such as glyphosate (Roundup ®) tolerance and resistance to the Bt trait found in crops such as corn and cotton. Last week, Barton County ANR Extension Agent shared a column on herbicide resistance from Extension Agronomy. But what exactly is resistance? Not necessarily to just pesticides but also crop resistance to something like a disease. And maybe the more important question is how or can it be prevented? Today's column tackles what is pesticide resistance and how does it develop.

August 03, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Maple leaf scorch

Maples are one of the most popular trees in Barton County. They give fabulous color in the fall, interesting bark in the winter, and overall is a good tree for this area. On the K-State Research and Extension list of recommended trees, 4 different varieties of Maple are listed for Central Kansas. So, why do I get so many phone calls about health issues with them? I think it is for a few reasons. First, because they are so beautiful and highly recommended, we have a lot that have been planted over the years in our communities. Second, they are ...

August 03, 2014 | | Agriculture


The ‘Big data’ deal

Some believe "big data" may be the next renaissance in agriculture. Others call it the greatest advance in agriculture since the Green Revolution during the 1940s, '50s and '60s when one of the biggest waves of research and technology spurred the growth of agricultural production around the world. Some compare big data with the biotech revolution.

July 27, 2014 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


GMO – A Blessing or a Curse? Finale

Today, after the previous columns briefly describing genetic engineering and GMO traits found in agriculture, it's time to wrap this up. So IS GMO technology a Blessing or a Curse? That is up to the reader to decide based on facts and reasoning. To help let's list the potential benefits followed by the potential pitfalls as objectively as possible.

July 27, 2014 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


CEA Agriculture and Natural Resources

There have been several phone calls over the past few weeks about Palmer amaranth (Palmer pigweed). Several producers and local agronomists are noticing that it is not being controlled effectively in places with Glyphosate. I was e-mailed a news release this week that will give some information about what is being observed in the state, especially in Central Kansas at this time. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, you can get a hold of me by phone, email or stopping in the Extension office.

July 27, 2014 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


“Women on the Farm” workshop viewed as a success

"It is difficult to make decisions or even know where to start after the death of someone close to you." Speaker D. Elizabeth Kiss, PH.D, KSU told an audience of 30 at the workshop for "Women on the Farm".

July 27, 2014 | Pam Tucker | Agriculture


Kansas wheat meetings and wheat U approach

Wheat harvest has mostly wrapped up and temperatures have increased, so take a few days and cool off at Kansas Wheat's Annual Meeting and High Plains Journal's Wheat U on Aug. 4 and 5 in Wichita. Wheat board meetings will be held on Monday, August 4, beginning at 11 a.m., at the Sedgwick County Extension Office and will include separate and joint meetings of the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers. The Commission meeting is open for interested parties to attend.

July 27, 2014 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


Scientists complete chromosome-based draft of the wheat genome

Several Kansas State University researchers were essential in helping scientists assemble a draft of a genetic blueprint of bread wheat, also known as common wheat. The food plant is grown on more than 531 million acres around the world and produces nearly 700 million tons of food each year.

July 20, 2014 | | Agriculture


Scientists complete chromosome-based draft of the wheat genome

Several Kansas State University researchers were essential in helping scientists assemble a draft of a genetic blueprint of bread wheat, also known as common wheat. The food plant is grown on more than 531 million acres around the world and produces nearly 700 million tons of food each year.

July 20, 2014 | | Agriculture


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Page 8 of 50

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Kansas Commodity Classic to be held on Feb. 6, in Manhattan

All Kansas farmers are invited to the Kansas Commodity Classic on Friday, Feb. 6. The Commodity Classic is the annual convention of the Kansas Corn, Wheat and Grain Sorghum Associations, and will take place at the at the Hilton Garden Inn, 410 S 3rd St, Manhattan, Kan., with registration beginning at 7:30 a.m. It is free to attend and includes a complimentary breakfast and lunch; however pre-registration is requested.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


Trade already

With the advent of 2015, there's hope the Obama administration will follow through on its ambitious trade agenda. Leaders on both sides of the Atlantic agree a more open trade partnership makes sense.

January 18, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Tree order forms

A forester once told me that you know a drought is severe if you see Red Cedar trees dying. All around the county, you can see Cedars in tree rows and windbreaks dead and brown. If you are looking to replace your tree row, The Kansas Forest Service offers low-cost tree and shrub seedlings for use in conservation plantings. Plants are one to two years old and sizes vary from 5 to 18 inches, depending on species. Orders are accepted from now through the first full week in May each year, but order early to insure receiving the items you ...

January 18, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part 2

Last week's column briefly discussed some of the reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century. Drivers for change included two World Wars, the Great Depression, economic conditions after WWII, and the Federal Government. One reader pointed out that the column almost painted war as a good thing for agriculture. That wasn't the intent. The fact is the driver for change and the development of new techniques and technologies is typically an event or events forcing and accelerating change. Now, how did events change farming over the last century.

January 18, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: soils sustain life

Many authors have documented the rise and fall of civilizations throughout time. Reasons for this rollercoaster effect are numerous-from human-influenced changes such as conquest, culture or religion, to events that occur in the natural environment including changes in climate or the presence of natural resources, such as soil.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


Finding best ways to safeguard beef production in changing climate

Under a bright blue, fall Oklahoma sky in a serene setting, cattle are doing what cattle do – quietly moving through a pasture looking for the next best thing to eat. As they graze, instruments are recording how much methane they are producing.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas falling behind in feeding its own, study says

The good news is, Kansas consumers spend $7.2 billion on food each year. The bad news is, $6.5 billion of it comes from beyond the state's borders, obesity is on the rise, 56 percent of Kansas farmers require secondary income and only eight percent of Kansans have healthy diets, according to a 2010 survey by the Kansas Health Institute.

January 11, 2015 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Kansas is your customer

While food safety will always be the cornerstone of our production process, allegiance is making inroads into why and where consumers buy their products.

January 11, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


USDA seeks public comment on the Environmental Quality Incentives program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is publishing a rule that outlines how it will improve the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), one of USDA's largest conservation programs. The interim final rule includes program changes authorized by Congress in the 2014 Farm Bill.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas women farmers shift agriculture and food production trends

Although women represented only 28 percent of Kansas farmers in 2012 and the number of farmers is declining overall, women are ramping-up their involvement in several of the state's less common forms of agriculture. The Kansas Rural Center is one organization in Kansas that continues to advance programs to better serve the needs of this historically underserved population.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part I

We all know a century is a long time. In U.S. agriculture the changes make it seem more like a millennium. We are aware of the obvious changes in crops, crop yields, machinery and technology, demographics, and globalization. But where and why did those changes happen and how have these changes changed, or not changed, what a farmer has become?

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farmers ready to juggle acreage mix in 2015

Record crops and low prices have farmers embracing change in 2015, with acreage shifts continuing to move fields from corn to soybeans, according to the latest Farm Futures survey.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


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