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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Our turn

Once in a long while all the chips fall the right way and a Kansas farm family raises the best wheat crop it ever had. The Kent Winter family of northwestern Sedgwick County harvested such a crop in late June of this year.

July 14, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Grub problems in lawns

This week, I wanted to share with you all a small excerpt from the Entomology department's newsletter. I have received a few calls about grub problems in lawns, so I felt that this was important to share.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture


Plant pathology department named best in US

The U.S. National Research Council has ranked Kansas State University's department of plant pathology as the No. 1 plant pathology department in the nation.

July 14, 2013 | | Agriculture


Senators call for emergency CRP haying, grazing

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) last week called for emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands to help livestock producers suffering from sustained and critical drought.

July 13, 2013 | | Agriculture


Natural must be good right?

Many of you have likely heard of the discovery of Roundup Ready® wheat in the Pacific Northwest where no of Roundup Ready® wheat should have been. It created quite a stir and heated up the debate regarding GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) and their safety. The problem here was although this GMO wheat had been developed and deemed safe for consumption; it was shelved, never to be released for production. The primary reason not to release this wheat was purely economic. Much of our domestic wheat production is destined for export, especially in an area like the Pacific Northwest, and many ...

July 12, 2013 | BY VIC MARTIN | Agriculture


Sweltering in the ‘dog days’ of summer...Bring on the rain

In case you hadn't noticed, much of the state may already be mired in the "dog days" of summer. You might be thinking, it's too early for such hot temperatures, but think again.

July 07, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Agricultural flight demonstration underscores benefits and economic impact of unmanned aircraft

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will have a significant impact on Kansas' precision agriculture industry and overall economy, according to elected officials, academics and industry leaders speaking at a press conference today. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) joined leaders at Kansas State University and Michael Toscano, president & CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), to launch a flight demonstration of numerous UAS used to enhance the care of crops, livestock, pasture and rangelands. Sen. Moran and Toscano also delivered remarks on the significant economic growth and job creation potential of UAS in Kansas.

July 07, 2013 | | Agriculture


Where Did the Wheat Come From?

The wheat harvest is essentially over. While hardly a bumper crop, the area, especially as you move east had fair to very good yields. So how did we end up with a crop in the midst of an exceptional drought? The obvious answer is the precipitation received, especially after the first of the year, but it's a little more complicated than that. Those fields that missed out on the rains, primarily the western half of the area, had miserable yields so the amount of precipitation certainly mattered. What factors allowed many producers to harvest at least average yields?

July 07, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Immigration reform now

The immigration debate has begun in Washington, D.C., and not a moment too soon. It is past time our failed immigration and guest-worker program was fixed.

June 30, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Hays soybean farmer honored for service to the biodiesel industry

The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) recently recognized Harold Kraus, Hays, for his outstanding efforts in advancing the biodiesel industry. Kraus has served as the primary representative for the Kansas Soybean Commission (KSC) on the NBB for 12 years and is retiring from the position.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


Scientists discover gene that gives wheat resistance to deadly wheat stem rust pathogen Ug99

The world's food supply got a little more plentiful thanks to a scientific breakthrough.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


When Is a Drought Over?

Probably nobody in the Golden Belt is under any illusion the drought is over. As we are well past the halfway point in wheat harvest, yields are all over the map. They tend to be much worse going west from Great Bend and fair to very good as you proceed east. Reports indicate yields less than 20 bushels per acre in western Barton County to some 60 bushel per acre fields in the east. These yields certainly provide a dramatic representation of where the snow and rains fell since the first of the year. Based on 60 bushel wheat, it ...

June 30, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Watch for Thrips in your garden after harvest

With wheat harvest almost over for the year, insects will possibly be on the move into your garden. One of the main culprits to watch out for right now is thrips. K-State Research and Extension Entomologist J.P. Michaud says that there is a healthy population of thrips in the wheat fields in the area. With harvest removing one of their food sources, your garden is one place they may go.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


National Pollinator Week

When it comes to pollinators, Kansas farmers and ranchers are creating habitat to boost their populations and harness these critters' value. With National Pollinator Week beginning today, U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is using the opportunity to promote pollinators, like bees and butterflies. Pollinators provide crucial assistance to fruit, vegetable, and seed crops, but many species are seeing their numbers fall. Agricultural producers across the nation work with NRCS to create ideal habitat for pollinators and increase populations in simple and significant ways.

June 23, 2013 | | Agriculture


Make it a safe harvest

Long hours, a flurry of activity, less-than-ideal weather conditions and work involving large machinery combine to make wheat harvest a potentially dangerous period.

June 23, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


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Page 29 of 52

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Moran meets with ag secretary

WASHINGTON – This week, U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), chairman of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee, met with United States Department of Agriculture Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack about priorities for the 114th Congress.

February 27, 2015 | | Agriculture


Fire remains vital management tool

Every spring, the ritual continues. Farmers, stockmen and landowners continue to use fire as a range management tool while maintaining the economic viability of the Flint Hills.

February 22, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Short and Long-Term Drought Outlook

The latest Drought Monitor Update (February 17) indicates almost the entire state is at least abnormally dry. Most of Barton County falls in this category except for the extreme southern section. South into Stafford and west into Pawnee Counties the shortage increases to moderate drought. As you move south towards the border and to Southwest and West Central Kansas the severity increases to severe with a small area rated as extreme drought. This is in spite of slightly above average precipitation experienced in the Barton area over the last several weeks.

February 22, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Study finds climate change may dramatically reduce wheat production

A recent study involving Kansas State University researchers finds that in the coming decades at least one-quarter of the world's wheat production will be lost to extreme weather from climate change if no adaptive measures are taken.

February 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


Planting fruit trees

If you're pondering buying a fruit tree, here are some comments from the K-State Research and Extension's Horticulture department on ones that are commonly grown in Kansas. Fruit trees are a long-term investment requiring careful thought before purchase. Begin by choosing fruit you will eat, not fruit that appears attractive in the catalog. Other considerations are outlined below. For more choices, go to the publication "Small- and Tree-Fruit Cultivars" at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/bookstore/pubs/MF1028.pdf. You may also request this publication from me at the Barton County K-State Research and Extension office.

February 22, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Registration open for Kansas Rural Center “Women in Farming” risk management education workshop

Registration is open for the first in a series of four "women only" Women in Farming Risk Management Education workshops to be hosted by the Kansas Rural Center during the spring and summer of 2015. All four of the workshops in KRC's "Women in Farming" series will highlight the opportunities and the challenges women face as they implement new enterprises on existing farms, begin farming or take over family operations, or just try to adopt new practices and enterprises with their families.

February 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


Getting the Truth Out In Agriculture

We are told we live in the age of information and have for at least several decades. Information, specifically access to information, is an asset as valuable as money. "Knowledge is power" is a slogan used in advertising and is first attributed to Sir Francis Bacon in 1597. Governments spend billions of dollars annually gathering information on almost everything imaginable. Information, or lack thereof, has decided the fates of nations, the success of companies, and having necessary information is vital to all of us in our everyday lives. Through formal education, on the job training, connections with others, or trial ...

February 15, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Kansas NRCS announces National Initiatives for 2015

Eric B. Banks, State Conservationist with U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announces five national initiatives being offered in Kansas through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP): Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative, National Water Quality Initiative, On-Farm Energy Initiative, Organic Initiative, and Seasonal High Tunnel Initiative. While NRCS accepts applications for EQIP on a continuous basis, NRCS has set a deadline of March 20, to apply for 2015 initiatives funding.

February 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


Soil Issues

Though soil tests are useful for identifying nutrient deficiencies as well as soil pH, they do not tell the whole story. The KSRE Soils Lab often receive soils from gardeners that are having a difficult time growing crops even though the soil test shows the pH is fine and nutrients are not deficient. Here are some factors that can affect plant growth that are not due to nutrient deficiencies or pH.

February 15, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


No eggs for breakfast?

The egg is in hot water again thanks to recent reports of high cholesterol levels in the U.S. population. With this linkage between high serum cholesterol and coronary heart disease (CHD), these studies and others have led people to believe CHD is the fault of "those dirty rotten eggs."

February 15, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


K-State Research and Extension offering Family and Youth Events

K-State Research and Extension is offering family and youth events, available to all interested persons. For more information about these, as well as more localized events, check with your local K-State Research and Extension office.

February 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


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