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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Spring is here so where are we?

It's Easter weekend and this past Thursday night saw some fairly severe weather in the area complete with power outages. Spring is really here, especially after the extremely warm temperatures this past week. Today is April 5, so area producers should have wrapped up side dressing the 2015 wheat crop and corn planters are being readied to begin planting shortly. Alfalfa is greening up and in some parts of the state, including some fields here, wheat producers are assessing winter survival. Since not a great deal is going on just yet, let's catch up on what is known.

April 05, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Use your head for something other than a hat rack

If Billy Crystal's Fernando character were to visit a Kansas farm this spring you can be sure he wouldn't be telling too many farmers, "Darling, you look marvelous." You can also bet not too many farmers, step into the cab of their tractors wearing any of the high fashions portrayed on the pages of GQ or Esquire.

March 29, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Crabgrass

Over the year, I get many calls from people concerned about crabgrass and how to get rid of it. The general rule for killing weeds is getting them when they are vulnerable. Right now is the time to treat your lawn if you have seen crabgrass in the past. Here is a write-up from K-State Research and Extension about treating your yard for crabgrass so that you have to best chance of getting rid of it in your turf.

March 29, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


New commissioners elected to Kansas Commodity Commissions

The Kansas Department of Agriculture announced the results of the elections held for the five grain commodity commissions-corn, grain sorghum, soybeans, sunflowers and wheat in districts One, Two and Three in the Western region of the state.

March 29, 2015 | | Agriculture


Tying Up Loose Ends

Today, let's catch up on some loose ends that haven't been addressed over the last few weeks during the discussion on soil acidity. Summer row crop planting season is almost here and winter wheat produces have been hard at work topdressing their crop.

March 29, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Farm Bureau members visit Washington D.C.

March 29, 2015 | | Agriculture


Poultry expert says avian influenza strain not harmful to humans or poultry products

A highly pathogenic avian influenza confirmed in four states can be very deadly for birds, but a Kansas State University poultry expert says humans don't need to worry about their own health or contaminated poultry products.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


Multimillion-dollar project using unmanned aerial systems to detect emerging pest insects, diseases

Kansas State University is leading an international, multimillion-dollar project that is looking at unmanned aerial systems - or UAS - as a quick and efficient method to detect pest insects and diseases in food crops before outbreaks happen.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


Virtual Kansas Dairy Farm tour goes live on YouTube

In celebration of Ag Day and Ag Month, the agricultural organizations in Kansas partnered together to launch a virtual tour of a dairy farm. The video, which has been posted on the KSRE YouTube channel, features a Kansas dairy farm and can be used as an educational tool for classrooms and organizations statewide.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Soil Environment – Soil Acidity Conclusion

Over the last few weeks this column has explored what acidity is, what determined the native (original) soil pH condition present, and how agricultural practices have affected soil pH over time. This week wraps this up and discusses how producers can adjust soil pH to optimize crop production. Remember for the crops common to our area the optimal pH is approximately 6.3 to 7.3 and acid soils have pH readings lower than 7 while basic soils are above 7. While soils in our area may have pH readings in the 8 range, typically they aren't like the ...

March 22, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Prairie fire

The smell and sight of spring burning on the Flint Hills evoked this childhood memory.

March 22, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Great Bend Farm and Ranch Expo

As I was glancing at my calendar today, I realized that April is almost here. This year is really flying by! With the start of April, we will have the Great Bend Farm and Ranch Expo out at the Expo grounds just west of Great Bend. The 3 day event will have programs, vendors, and a chance to meet up and see what's new in farming and ranching. Together with K-State Research and Extension, Kansas Farm Management, and the Kansas Forest service, we will be giving informative lunch time programs at noon every day in Expo 3, so come ...

March 22, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


To green or not to green?

Caring for the environment used to be tough duty. However, during the last couple of decades, it's become a marketing opportunity.

March 15, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Soil Environment – Soil Acidity Part 3

column discusses how soil acidity changes as producers have managed it for crop production since Kansas was settled. We will focus on were soil pH started, how converting the land to crop production changed pH, and the role of evolving cultural practices. It may be helpful to refer to the previous two columns.

March 15, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


K-State Agricultural Economist following avian influenza developments

News that more than 40 countries have banned poultry imports from Minnesota after a lethal strain of avian influenza was confirmed in a turkey flock there has now been compounded by news of confirmed cases in Missouri and Arkansas turkeys.

March 15, 2015 | | Agriculture


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Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


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