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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Time To Take A Break and Give Thanks

The weather over the last few days has provided an exclamation point to the end of the 2013 cropping season. With the exception of some fields of grain sorghum waiting to be harvested, crops are in the bin and the wheat that was going to be planted has been. Now is a time, unless you have cattle, to slow down a little and catch a breath. Or at least it used to be a "down" time. The saying goes, "Nature abhors a vacuum," and that applies to producer downtime, especially as the days of only growing wheat become a distant ...

November 24, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Where is the farm bill?

To say the farm bill has moved like molasses through Congress the past three years is a gross understatement. This branch of our federal government continues to be mired in the mud of partisan politics.

November 17, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Milling executives get schooled

It may come as a surprise that the participants at the Buhler-KSU Executive Milling Course at the International Grains Program (IGP) this week are not millers. But, that is exactly the point. The week-long course, underway currently, is designed to provide members of milling operations, who may not be millers themselves, a basic understanding of the milling process.

November 17, 2013 | | Agriculture


Proper hay sampling is important

At this time of year, many producers are starting to make plans to switch from pastures and fields to forage such as prairie hay to keep their livestock healthy through the winter to come. One of the best things that can be done is to have your forage tested. That way you know what its nutritional composition is, and if you will need to add any supplements to their diet to satisfy their requirements. The first step to determine this is sampling the forage. Here are the recommended principles for proper hay sampling to be able to get the best ...

November 17, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Consumers and Agricultural Production

Last week's column dealt with direct changes to foods on the grocery shelf, the end product. This week let's examine changes made out in the field long before food hits the shelf. These are changes due to consumer preferences, food safety, economics, potential environmental damage and in response to the environmental pressures. Naturally there are many more changes than can be listed here.

November 17, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


KSU, Merck partner to open diagnostic lab

OLATHE – Kansas State University Olathe is the site of the new Microbial Surveillance Lab, a partnership with Merck Animal Health. The lab will be a second site for the K-State Veterinary Diagnostic Lab, which is based on the Manhattan campus.

November 15, 2013 | | Agriculture


Former U.S. ag secretaries talk past and present policy

With more than three decades of collective service under their belts, six former U.S. agricultural secretaries discussed and cussed climate change, international trade, subsidies, crop insurance, food stamps and a bushel basket full of other ag issues Oct. 21.

November 10, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


New addition to the Grain Science Complex

With the official dedication of the O.H. Kruse Feed Technology Innovation Center on Oct. 11, Kansas State University's Grain Science Complex added another building, and increased opportunities for customer education, hands-on experience for students and enhanced research capacity.

November 10, 2013 | | Agriculture


Consumer Preferences, Food Safety, and Health

You may have missed some items regarding changes occuring in the grocery section where you shop. While they may not affect agriculture directly, they indicate changes to the items in the title. So what exactly are these changes?

November 10, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Grappling over trade

During the last decade, growth of U.S. agricultural exports to the European Union (EU) has been the slowest among this country's top 10 export destinations. If U.S. farmers and ranchers had an opportunity to compete, trade with the EU could become a growth market for them.

November 03, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Pruning trees and shrubs

Over the last several weeks, the discussion on pruning and cutting back trees and shrubs has come up more than once. I thought that I would share a short article from K-State Research and Extension about how and when you should plan on trimming those woody plants.

November 03, 2013 | | Agriculture


The Measurement of Weather

Hopefully most of you read the columns of Alicia Boor, the ANR agent with the Barton County Extension Office. Last week she discussed the definitions of various types of freezes and what they meant to anyone growing plants in our area. Even with these excellent definitions people still have questions and want to know why the weather reports and statistics they hear don't match their experience that day. Let's take a moment to explore why. The major reason involves how the measurements are taken and where.

November 03, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Agriculture foundation to hold annual meeting Nov. 14

The 2013 Kansas Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom (KFAC) Annual Meeting will be held Thurs., Nov. 14, in Manhattan. The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. with a lunch following. The meeting will take place at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center, where the KFAC office is located.

November 03, 2013 | | Agriculture


Agriculture is up to the task

The end of agriculture in America is near. American agriculture will soon lose its competitive edge.

October 27, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Kansas State University receives support from Bayer CropScience to further education and wheat resea

Using funds provided under the recently completed wheat germplasm and technology license agreement with Bayer CropScience in Research Triangle Park, N.C., the Kansas State University Foundation has made a contribution to the Department of Plant Pathology in the College of Agriculture to help establish an endowed chair in honor of renowned K-State professor Bikram Gill.

October 27, 2013 | | Agriculture


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Page 28 of 58

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


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