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Archive By Section - Agriculture


Natural must be good right?

Many of you have likely heard of the discovery of Roundup Ready® wheat in the Pacific Northwest where no of Roundup Ready® wheat should have been. It created quite a stir and heated up the debate regarding GMO (Genetically Modified Organisms) and their safety. The problem here was although this GMO wheat had been developed and deemed safe for consumption; it was shelved, never to be released for production. The primary reason not to release this wheat was purely economic. Much of our domestic wheat production is destined for export, especially in an area like the Pacific Northwest, and many ...

July 12, 2013 | BY VIC MARTIN | Agriculture


Sweltering in the ‘dog days’ of summer...Bring on the rain

In case you hadn't noticed, much of the state may already be mired in the "dog days" of summer. You might be thinking, it's too early for such hot temperatures, but think again.

July 07, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Agricultural flight demonstration underscores benefits and economic impact of unmanned aircraft

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) will have a significant impact on Kansas' precision agriculture industry and overall economy, according to elected officials, academics and industry leaders speaking at a press conference today. U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) joined leaders at Kansas State University and Michael Toscano, president & CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), to launch a flight demonstration of numerous UAS used to enhance the care of crops, livestock, pasture and rangelands. Sen. Moran and Toscano also delivered remarks on the significant economic growth and job creation potential of UAS in Kansas.

July 07, 2013 | | Agriculture


Where Did the Wheat Come From?

The wheat harvest is essentially over. While hardly a bumper crop, the area, especially as you move east had fair to very good yields. So how did we end up with a crop in the midst of an exceptional drought? The obvious answer is the precipitation received, especially after the first of the year, but it's a little more complicated than that. Those fields that missed out on the rains, primarily the western half of the area, had miserable yields so the amount of precipitation certainly mattered. What factors allowed many producers to harvest at least average yields?

July 07, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Immigration reform now

The immigration debate has begun in Washington, D.C., and not a moment too soon. It is past time our failed immigration and guest-worker program was fixed.

June 30, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Hays soybean farmer honored for service to the biodiesel industry

The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) recently recognized Harold Kraus, Hays, for his outstanding efforts in advancing the biodiesel industry. Kraus has served as the primary representative for the Kansas Soybean Commission (KSC) on the NBB for 12 years and is retiring from the position.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


Scientists discover gene that gives wheat resistance to deadly wheat stem rust pathogen Ug99

The world's food supply got a little more plentiful thanks to a scientific breakthrough.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


When Is a Drought Over?

Probably nobody in the Golden Belt is under any illusion the drought is over. As we are well past the halfway point in wheat harvest, yields are all over the map. They tend to be much worse going west from Great Bend and fair to very good as you proceed east. Reports indicate yields less than 20 bushels per acre in western Barton County to some 60 bushel per acre fields in the east. These yields certainly provide a dramatic representation of where the snow and rains fell since the first of the year. Based on 60 bushel wheat, it ...

June 30, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Watch for Thrips in your garden after harvest

With wheat harvest almost over for the year, insects will possibly be on the move into your garden. One of the main culprits to watch out for right now is thrips. K-State Research and Extension Entomologist J.P. Michaud says that there is a healthy population of thrips in the wheat fields in the area. With harvest removing one of their food sources, your garden is one place they may go.

June 30, 2013 | | Agriculture


National Pollinator Week

When it comes to pollinators, Kansas farmers and ranchers are creating habitat to boost their populations and harness these critters' value. With National Pollinator Week beginning today, U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is using the opportunity to promote pollinators, like bees and butterflies. Pollinators provide crucial assistance to fruit, vegetable, and seed crops, but many species are seeing their numbers fall. Agricultural producers across the nation work with NRCS to create ideal habitat for pollinators and increase populations in simple and significant ways.

June 23, 2013 | | Agriculture


Make it a safe harvest

Long hours, a flurry of activity, less-than-ideal weather conditions and work involving large machinery combine to make wheat harvest a potentially dangerous period.

June 23, 2013 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Do You Feel Lucky?

Wheat harvest is underway in Kansas. Later than normal but the weather forecast should move it along nicely. Corn development is lagging although good progress has been made with the heat and rains many received. However, the lack of rain in the forecast and the high temperatures combined with corn behind in development sets the crop up, especially the dryland acreage, for a rough time during tasselling, silking, and grain fill.

June 23, 2013 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Bison projected to weigh less and be smaller in size from climate change, may affect cattle similarl

As temperatures go up, bison get smaller.

June 23, 2013 | | Agriculture


Tomato plant concerns

Tomato plants are one of the most popular plants for any gardener to grow. Whether this garden is your first you have ever tried, or you have been growing your own vegetables as long as you can remember, tomatoes most likely are in it. With their popularity, and having a couple of questions come into the office lately, I decided to share a few articles by Ward Upham, horticulture expert for K-State Research and Extension this week for possible concerns with your plants at home.

June 23, 2013 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Farm Service Agency County Committee nomination period begins June 17

Kansas Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director Adrian J. Polansky announced today that the nomination period for local FSA county committees begins on Monday, June 17th.

June 16, 2013 | | Agriculture


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Page 31 of 54

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Use your head for something other than a hat rack

If Billy Crystal's Fernando character were to visit a Kansas farm this spring you can be sure he wouldn't be telling too many farmers, "Darling, you look marvelous." You can also bet not too many farmers, step into the cab of their tractors wearing any of the high fashions portrayed on the pages of GQ or Esquire.

March 29, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Crabgrass

Over the year, I get many calls from people concerned about crabgrass and how to get rid of it. The general rule for killing weeds is getting them when they are vulnerable. Right now is the time to treat your lawn if you have seen crabgrass in the past. Here is a write-up from K-State Research and Extension about treating your yard for crabgrass so that you have to best chance of getting rid of it in your turf.

March 29, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


New commissioners elected to Kansas Commodity Commissions

The Kansas Department of Agriculture announced the results of the elections held for the five grain commodity commissions-corn, grain sorghum, soybeans, sunflowers and wheat in districts One, Two and Three in the Western region of the state.

March 29, 2015 | | Agriculture


Tying Up Loose Ends

Today, let's catch up on some loose ends that haven't been addressed over the last few weeks during the discussion on soil acidity. Summer row crop planting season is almost here and winter wheat produces have been hard at work topdressing their crop.

March 29, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Farm Bureau members visit Washington D.C.

March 29, 2015 | | Agriculture


Poultry expert says avian influenza strain not harmful to humans or poultry products

A highly pathogenic avian influenza confirmed in four states can be very deadly for birds, but a Kansas State University poultry expert says humans don't need to worry about their own health or contaminated poultry products.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


Multimillion-dollar project using unmanned aerial systems to detect emerging pest insects, diseases

Kansas State University is leading an international, multimillion-dollar project that is looking at unmanned aerial systems - or UAS - as a quick and efficient method to detect pest insects and diseases in food crops before outbreaks happen.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


Virtual Kansas Dairy Farm tour goes live on YouTube

In celebration of Ag Day and Ag Month, the agricultural organizations in Kansas partnered together to launch a virtual tour of a dairy farm. The video, which has been posted on the KSRE YouTube channel, features a Kansas dairy farm and can be used as an educational tool for classrooms and organizations statewide.

March 22, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Soil Environment – Soil Acidity Conclusion

Over the last few weeks this column has explored what acidity is, what determined the native (original) soil pH condition present, and how agricultural practices have affected soil pH over time. This week wraps this up and discusses how producers can adjust soil pH to optimize crop production. Remember for the crops common to our area the optimal pH is approximately 6.3 to 7.3 and acid soils have pH readings lower than 7 while basic soils are above 7. While soils in our area may have pH readings in the 8 range, typically they aren't like the ...

March 22, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Prairie fire

The smell and sight of spring burning on the Flint Hills evoked this childhood memory.

March 22, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Great Bend Farm and Ranch Expo

As I was glancing at my calendar today, I realized that April is almost here. This year is really flying by! With the start of April, we will have the Great Bend Farm and Ranch Expo out at the Expo grounds just west of Great Bend. The 3 day event will have programs, vendors, and a chance to meet up and see what's new in farming and ranching. Together with K-State Research and Extension, Kansas Farm Management, and the Kansas Forest service, we will be giving informative lunch time programs at noon every day in Expo 3, so come ...

March 22, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


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