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Wheat plot

This year's wheat crop has had to have nine lives in order to survive to this point. The stressors for this year's crop have been many including: winter-kill, drought, insects, various rusts, and mosaic diseases. The rains came late as well, leaving the wheat shorter than normal. Even though the wheat is short, and many issues have been against it, the wheat still has a chance in many places to make a decent harvest. The individual wheat varieties are responding in various ways to the different stressors that have been present this year. This is one major reason ...

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


Clinton J, Hammeke joins Membership of American Angus Association

Clinton J. Hammeke, Great Bend, is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


NRCS extends comment period for Agricultural Conservation Easement program interim rule

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller recently announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will extend the deadline to provide public comment on the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program's (ACEP) interim rule until May 28.

May 10, 2015 | | Agriculture


The Drought’s Over, Right?

The last part of April and the beginning of May certainly brought a change in the weather pattern. An unsettled weather pattern with heavy rains, hail, strong winds and even tornados brought much needed moisture and as this is written the end of this week is looking unsettled. As is common with this pattern, while most all areas received rain, totals have ranged from around an inch or less to close to ten inches for some. On average it appears most of the area two to three inches or more. This helps but the area is still under the average ...

May 10, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Boomin’ times

Being one of the early Baby Boomers there's plenty to talk about in my lifetime that's lasted into its sixth decade. During this wonderful, turbulent time my generation has been praised and pummeled.

May 10, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Tour’s projection forecasts 288M bushels

MANHATTAN -- The 2015 Hard Red Winter Wheat Tour was full of surprises for participants and led to a sliver of hope for producers statewide. On day three, the participants stopped at 70 fields, an increase from last year's day three total of 45 fields. The daily average was 48.9 bushels an acre, more than an 11 bushel increase from last year.

May 08, 2015 | | Agriculture


Stripe rust

Stripe rust has been found in several fields of wheat in south central Kansas, including Barton County. At the time it was found, it was still at low levels and in trace amounts. With the cool wet weather we have been experiencing, it is something that producers should be on the watch for, and scouting their fields to identify and monitor.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


Time for incentive-based conservation

Farmers and ranchers believe reforms are needed in the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to balance needs of species with economic impacts on agriculture.

May 03, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: Soils clean and capture water

Picture transitioning from a rural setting that includes woodlands, wildlife habitat and farms, to urban areas that consist of concrete, parking lots, streets and buildings. Rural land in a more natural state has the ability to soak up water in the soil more efficiently than urban areas with impervious surfaces that can lead to more runoff.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


What Exactly Is Organic? Conclusion

The last several columns provided general background on the rapidly expanding organic foods market. Today's column briefly outlines conventionally produced foods to highlight the differences between the two. Perhaps the first question to deal with is "Are conventionally produced foods inorganic?"

May 03, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


K-State Research and Extension names Aguilera a 2015 summer intern

Audree Aguilera, a general science student at Barton Community College, has been selected as a 2015 summer intern for K-State Research and Extension.

May 03, 2015 | | Agriculture


Specialty crop growers

Maintaining the rich heritage of agricultural stewardship in Kansas, the Kansas Department of Agriculture has teamed up with DriftWatch, an online mapping tool, to protect the state's specialty crops.

April 26, 2015 | | Agriculture


Nightcrawlers

Lately, I have been getting many calls with people concerned with small mounds in their turf, making it difficult to mow, work or play in their yard. Most of the time, the issue is earthworms that are very active at this time of year. In my research, I came across this short piece of information on nightcrawlers, from the K-State Entomology department. I thought I would share this to give more infomation about these beneficial but sometimes annoying worms.

April 26, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Stockman’s instincts rooted in the heart

Farmer stockmen possess a burning desire to care for their livestock. A few years back, I witnessed this dedication on a dairy in Franklin County.

April 26, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


What Exactly Is Organic? Part 3

This week wraps up the discussion of "organic" foods before comparing them to "conventionally" produced foods. Last week's column briefly described what organic means in general terms. When you purchase a product "Certified Organic" what does that really mean?

April 26, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


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Page 35 of 90

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Losing our most valuable natural resource – water erosion part III

Today's column finishes up the discussion of water erosion with how to minimize soil loss based upon the USLE, the Universal Soil Loss Equation ...

July 22, 2017 | Special to the Tribune | Agriculture


Essential oils can assist with livestock digestion, study finds

MANHATTAN - Kansas State University researchers have found that essential oils can play a role in livestock health.

July 21, 2017 | Special to the Tribune | Agriculture


Kansas Department of Agriculture responds to herbicide use complaints

MANHATTAN - The Kansas Department of Agriculture has experienced an increase in herbicide misuse complaints alleging crop damage due to herbicide products containing dicamba. KDA's ...

July 15, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Losing our most valuable natural resource – water erosion part II

Last week's column focused on the types of soil water erosion. While government help in understanding and controlling wind erosion was the focus in ...

July 15, 2017 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Prickly pear cactus once dotted Kansas

Ever hear of digging prickly pear cactus out of a pasture for 50 cents an acre?

July 15, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Harnessing the power of Excel workshop set for July 25

The Women on the Farm Committee is hosting another Workshop set for July 25th. The Workshop topic will be "Harnessing the Power of Excel." The ...

July 15, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


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