View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Agriculture


Wheat plot tour is growing

The wheat is growing quickly, despite the challenges this year. We have had several frost and freeze events that caused damage in some fields. Wheat Streak Mosaic has also been reported more often that in the past several years. To top that off, after a very dry winter, where an ice storm was our only source of significant moisture, we have had a very wet spring, causing some fields to suffer from too much moisture. For the most part though, our wheat still looks good, and has some strong potential.

May 20, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


It’s fun to compare then and now

Until recently, I often stopped by the corner convenience store after work to treat my sweet tooth. From the time I was 4 years old and walked barefoot down to Vern Wagner's little general store, I've always enjoyed the wonderful taste of chocolate.

May 20, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Audiences were spellbound at Downs

Outside the Downs depot a cold north wind blew storm clouds across the dark spring sky.

May 13, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Fertilize lawns in May

May is an excellent time to fertilize cool-season lawns such as tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass if they will be irrigated throughout the summer. Non-irrigated lawns often go through a period of summer dormancy because of drought and do not need this fertilization.

May 13, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


There ought to be a law

Before starting today's column, a very Happy Mother's Day to every mother reading this. Secondly, the area is in full graduation mode so congratulations to all those graduating from high school and college. Barton Community College's ceremony was this past Friday up on the hill with ceremonies soon to come at Fort Riley and Fort Leavenworth. Good luck in your future endeavors.

May 13, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Biosecurity Center at KSU offers animal disease response training

MANHATTAN - A Kansas State University center is offering training to help local and state emergency responders prepare for something they hope never happens: a serious animal disease outbreak.

May 06, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Tried and true

Seems some in our society today remain anxious about the food they buy and serve to their families. While it's not a recent phenomenon, questions about food safety are bound to occur.

May 06, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat could should show damage from cold

During the past few weeks, our weather has been less than ideal for our developing wheat crop. There have been several instances of frost and freezing temperatures reported, and a few fields have sustained freeze damage. This past weekend, we in Barton County were spared the winter storm that caused significant damage to crops in Western Kansas. The wheat in our area may still show signs of damage from the colder temperatures even though we did not get quite as cold, or have snow as in other portions of the state. Below is a little more information about freezing temperatures ...

May 06, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


2017 Wheat Tour, Day 1: Too early to know full extent of damage

"It's too early to tell," was the theme of day one of the 2017 Wheat Quality Council's Hard Winter Wheat Tour across Kansas.

May 06, 2017 | BY MARSHA BOSWELL Director of Communications, Kansas Wheat Council | Agriculture


Be aware of agriculture safety

There is a great deal happening this time of year. Classes at Barton Community College are over and it is finals and graduation week. Area schools are in the home stretch. A blizzard this past week in western Kansas hurt an already disease stressed wheat crop. Heavy rains in our area have delayed corn planting and input application. One event that likely passed under the radar was the Tractor Safety Class conducted by Barton County Extension Office.

May 06, 2017 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Essential micro-nutrients for plants

This week's column finishes the discussion of essential plant nutrients with the micro-nutrients. These are necessary for the plant to complete its life cycle but are needed in very small amounts compared to the macro-nutrients. The positively charged micro-nutrients are Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), and Nickel (Ni). The negatively charged anions are Boron (B), Molybdenum (Mo), and Chlorine (Cl). Nickel was the last essential element identified and other than knowing it is essential, we know very little about it and deficiencies are almost nonexistent. So what do these elements do that makes them essential?

April 29, 2017 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Wheat tour participants scout for rust, viruses

Nearly 90 grain traders, government officials, reporters, millers and even a few farmers start the 2017 Wheat Quality Council's Hard Winter Wheat Tour on May 1. Over the three-day tour, they will canvass the state's wheat crop from Manhattan to Colby to Wichita and back again. Along the way, they will stop every 15 miles or so to estimate yields in wheat fields on their routes. At the end, the results will be compiled into a yield estimate average for the Kansas hard red winter wheat crop.

April 29, 2017 | By Marsha Boswell Kansas Wheat Commission | Agriculture


Dress for safety in the field

As spring rolls around and field work picks up, so does the potential for farm accidents. Tractor overturns remain the leading cause of death for farmers, ranchers and workers.

April 29, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Field bindweed

Field bindweed is difficult to control, especially for homeowners, but there are options.

April 29, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Winter annual weeds are here

At this time of year, I tend to get questions about the purple flowers or dandelions in home lawns and what can be done now to get rid of them. The answer is really nothing right now. These winter annuals are nearing the end of their life cycle, and it is neither the time nor financially feasible to do anything about them at this point. I found a short article from the K-State Research and Extension Horticulture department regarding winter annual weeds, and what you can do to eventually remove them from your lawn.

April 22, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


« First  « Prev  1 2 3 4 5  Next »  Last »

Page 2 of 90

Articles by Section - Agriculture


Losing our most valuable natural resource – water erosion part III

Today's column finishes up the discussion of water erosion with how to minimize soil loss based upon the USLE, the Universal Soil Loss Equation ...

July 22, 2017 | Special to the Tribune | Agriculture


Essential oils can assist with livestock digestion, study finds

MANHATTAN - Kansas State University researchers have found that essential oils can play a role in livestock health.

July 21, 2017 | Special to the Tribune | Agriculture


Kansas Department of Agriculture responds to herbicide use complaints

MANHATTAN - The Kansas Department of Agriculture has experienced an increase in herbicide misuse complaints alleging crop damage due to herbicide products containing dicamba. KDA's ...

July 15, 2017 | Tribune Staff | Agriculture


Losing our most valuable natural resource – water erosion part II

Last week's column focused on the types of soil water erosion. While government help in understanding and controlling wind erosion was the focus in ...

July 15, 2017 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Prickly pear cactus once dotted Kansas

Ever hear of digging prickly pear cactus out of a pasture for 50 cents an acre?

July 15, 2017 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Harnessing the power of Excel workshop set for July 25

The Women on the Farm Committee is hosting another Workshop set for July 25th. The Workshop topic will be "Harnessing the Power of Excel." The ...

July 15, 2017 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


1

Page 1 of 1


Please wait ...