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Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part 2

Last week's column briefly discussed some of the reasons for the large changes in agriculture over the last century. Drivers for change included two World Wars, the Great Depression, economic conditions after WWII, and the Federal Government. One reader pointed out that the column almost painted war as a good thing for agriculture. That wasn't the intent. The fact is the driver for change and the development of new techniques and technologies is typically an event or events forcing and accelerating change. Now, how did events change farming over the last century.

January 18, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


The International Year of Soils: soils sustain life

Many authors have documented the rise and fall of civilizations throughout time. Reasons for this rollercoaster effect are numerous-from human-influenced changes such as conquest, culture or religion, to events that occur in the natural environment including changes in climate or the presence of natural resources, such as soil.

January 18, 2015 | | Agriculture


Finding best ways to safeguard beef production in changing climate

Under a bright blue, fall Oklahoma sky in a serene setting, cattle are doing what cattle do – quietly moving through a pasture looking for the next best thing to eat. As they graze, instruments are recording how much methane they are producing.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas falling behind in feeding its own, study says

The good news is, Kansas consumers spend $7.2 billion on food each year. The bad news is, $6.5 billion of it comes from beyond the state's borders, obesity is on the rise, 56 percent of Kansas farmers require secondary income and only eight percent of Kansans have healthy diets, according to a 2010 survey by the Kansas Health Institute.

January 11, 2015 | By Tom Parker, guest writer | Agriculture


Kansas is your customer

While food safety will always be the cornerstone of our production process, allegiance is making inroads into why and where consumers buy their products.

January 11, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


USDA seeks public comment on the Environmental Quality Incentives program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is publishing a rule that outlines how it will improve the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), one of USDA's largest conservation programs. The interim final rule includes program changes authorized by Congress in the 2014 Farm Bill.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Kansas women farmers shift agriculture and food production trends

Although women represented only 28 percent of Kansas farmers in 2012 and the number of farmers is declining overall, women are ramping-up their involvement in several of the state's less common forms of agriculture. The Kansas Rural Center is one organization in Kansas that continues to advance programs to better serve the needs of this historically underserved population.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farming January 2015 vs. January 1914 – Part I

We all know a century is a long time. In U.S. agriculture the changes make it seem more like a millennium. We are aware of the obvious changes in crops, crop yields, machinery and technology, demographics, and globalization. But where and why did those changes happen and how have these changes changed, or not changed, what a farmer has become?

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


Farmers ready to juggle acreage mix in 2015

Record crops and low prices have farmers embracing change in 2015, with acreage shifts continuing to move fields from corn to soybeans, according to the latest Farm Futures survey.

January 11, 2015 | | Agriculture


There are a lot programs on the way

Well, 2015 is starting out as busy as 2014 ended! I have several more upcoming programs to tell you all about in Agriculture and Horticulture. As always, you can contact me at the Extension Office for more information about these exciting opportunities coming your way!

January 09, 2015 | BY ALICIA BOOR | Agriculture


New Year’s resolutions – sort of

Before we all become buried in the new year, let's look at this new beginning with a bit of humor. Plenty of people trot out their lists of resolutions. Often, such lists are as long as their arms and last as long as their pinky.

January 04, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


National Festival of Breads deadline approaches

As the holiday season comes to an end, so does the entry period for the 2015 National Festival of Breads. The festival, sponsored by King Arthur Flour, Red Star Yeast and Kansas Wheat, is a national amateur bread baking competition that hundreds of bakers enter. The entry deadline for this year's competition is January 16, 2015.

January 04, 2015 | Jordan Hildebrand | Agriculture


KFB and KFAC to offer Be Ag-Wise workshops focusing on water conversation

Kansas Farm Bureau (KFB) and the Kansas Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom (KFAC) will host the eighth annual Be Ag-Wise professional development workshops early next year.

January 04, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture News for 2015

Happy New Year to everybody. 2014 is history and 2015 is officially here. The last year was interesting to say the least for crop and livestock producers. The drought, record high prices for protein (beef, pork, and poultry), significant declines in crop prices, record corn yields, and steep declines in fuel prices. The natural question then is what does 2015 have in store for agriculture? This list is in no particular order and accurately seeing into the future is tricky at best.

January 04, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


K-State researchers develop heat-tolerant wheat gene

If temperatures are too hot in May and June, farmers could lose more than layers.

December 28, 2014 | Julia Debes | Agriculture


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Articles by Section - Agriculture


Farmers encouraged to participate in Cost Share Program

Kansas Certified organic produces or farmers interested in becoming certified organic growers are encouraged to apply to receive cost share funds. The cost share program is funded by the 2014 Farm Bill to assist Kansas farmers in paying for organic certification or recertification.

June 28, 2015 | | Agriculture


Land is sacred

Almost every farmer has said in one way or another, "My life begins with the land." Look at it any way you want but this bedrock principle remains as it has for generations. Land ownership is the key to farming and ranching. Farmers are proud of the crops they grow and the land they work.

June 28, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


Wheat Market show

If you are out and about in Barton County right now, you will be able to spot combines rolling through the wheat fields. To me, it is one of the best sites of the year, and I can spend hours watching harvest. All of the hard work raising a crop is coming to the end for a while, and finally, the producer will be able to see a return on the long days he has spent to bring the crop full circle. Many people I have talked to are very pleased with how well the wheat has turned out this ...

June 28, 2015 | Alicia Boor | Agriculture


Wheat 2015 and terminology discussed

Before the rain Thursday night, wheat harvest was running full throttle and overall a much better crop than was predicted. The forecast indicates everyone should be back in the field soon if they aren't already (depending on the rainfall received). A few were commenting their crop would have been better except for late season disease pressure. What happened? Several things.

June 26, 2015 | BY DR. VICTOR L. MARTIN Agriculture instructor/coordinator for Barton Community College | Agriculture


Kansas Profile – Now That’s Rural: Dave Schultz – Seed Research Equipment Solutions

Let's go to South Africa. A group of scientists are planting a research plot to evaluate how a crop will perform. They are using a specialized planter which provides precise control and data on seed spacing and placement. Would you believe, this planter comes from halfway around the globe in the middle of Kansas?

June 21, 2015 | Ron Wilson director of the Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development at Kansas State University | Agriculture


Avian Flu

Avian Influenza has been in the local news many times over the last several months. Bird flu, as it is otherwise called first infected humans in China in 1997. In 2003, a larger outbreak of the flu crossing species barriers caused the World Health Organization to keep a closer eye on it and track the two potential viruses that are able to infect not just birds, but mammals including humans as well. The two strains of the virus that have crossed the species barrier are HH5N1 and H7N9 with possible pandemic threats since humans do not have any immunity to ...

June 21, 2015 | | Agriculture


Agriculture – Separating Fact From Fiction

We live in the Age of Information. Twenty-four hour news channels, Twitter, the internet, and various forms of social media are prevalent. Many argue, and correctly, that having instant platforms for information and instant access to information is a good thing. However, there is a downside – a lack of vetting of what is presented as data and fact. In the "Good Old Days" news outlets took great pains to verify facts and researchers needed to have articles reviewed by peers for the veracity of the methods used, the analysis of the data, and the conclusions made. While this still happens ...

June 21, 2015 | Dr. Victor L. Martin | Agriculture


Summertime moth brigade

It seems like only yesterday when I raced my buddies down the red-carpeted ramp of the Pix Theater in Hoxie trying to nail down those good seats. You know the ones I'm talking about – those in the front row where tennis shoes could be heard latching into congealed soda from the earlier matinee.

June 21, 2015 | John Schlageck, Kansas Farm Bureau | Agriculture


The Price of Change

Advancements in technology have arguably caused life to move at a much faster pace than it did even a decade ago. The speed at which change takes place today is phenomenal. While these advancements have brought about marvelous positive changes and benefits, they can inadvertently have equally dramatic and damaging negative effects.

June 21, 2015 | Steve Nelson, NRCS Soil Conservation Technician | Agriculture


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