View Mobile Site

Time of fall lawn chores

POSTED November 3, 2017 12:43 p.m.

Fall chores for the landscape are finally wrapping up for the year, but there are still a few items on the list. If you have a cool-season lawn, November is a good time to fertilize the turf for the winter hardiness and a quicker green up in the spring. Ward Upham, K-State Research and Extension’s horticulture expert talks about the method below.
November is the time to give cool-season lawns the last nitrogen application of the season. Why November? Because while top growth slows in response to cool temperatures, grass plants are still making food (carbohydrates) by photosynthesis. A November nitrogen application helps boost the photosynthesis rate. Carbohydrates that are not used in growth are stored in the crown and other storage tissues in the plant. These carbohydrate reserves help the turfgrass green up earlier in the spring and sustain growth into May without the need for early-spring (March or April) nitrogen. Those early-spring nitrogen applications are less desirable because they can lead to excessive shoot growth and reduced root growth. Other benefits of November-applied nitrogen for cool-season grasses include improved winter hardiness, root growth and shoot density.
How much should you apply? One to 1 to 1 ½ pounds actual nitrogen per 1,000 sq. ft. of lawn area is sufficient. Following the recommended spreader setting on the fertilizer bag should apply the correct amount of fertilizer. In order for this application to be effective, the nitrogen must be readily available to the plant, because the growing season is nearly over. Therefore, for a November application, use a soluble (quickly-available) nitrogen carrier such as urea or ammonium sulfate.
Many turfgrass fertilizers sold in garden centers and other retail outlets also contain soluble nitrogen. Avoid products that contain water-insoluble nitrogen (slow-release) for this application. As always, sweep up any fertilizer that gets on driveways, sidewalks, or streets and reapply it to the lawn.

Alicia Boor is the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Barton County K-State Research and Extension. Contact her by email at aboor@ksu.edu or call 620-793-1910.

COMMENTS

  • Bookmark and Share

No comments have been posted. Log in or Register to post a comment.
http://www.gbtribune.com/ encourages readers to interact with one another. We will not edit your comments, but we reserve the right to delete any inappropriate responses. To report offensive or inappropriate comments, contact our editor.

The comments below are from readers of http://beta.gbtribune.com/ and do not necessarily represent the views of The Newspaper or Morris Multimedia.
To post a comment you must be a registered user of www.gbtribune.com.


POST A COMMENT


Please wait ...