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Kansans dispose of 6 tons of medicines

Drug take-back events keep old meds from being abused

POSTED November 9, 2017 3:26 p.m.

 TOPEKA — Barton County residents pitched in 200 pounds of unused medicines as they joined all Kansans in safely disposing over six tons of medications during the Oct. 28 National Drug Take-Back Day, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said Tuesday.

Kansas law enforcement officers collected 13,337 pounds of medicines at 87 locations throughout the state during, according to a report from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration. During a drug take-back effort in April, another 16,31 pounds ere collected.

The October and April totals are up from 13,894 in April and 10,574 in October last year. There has been an annual increase in drugs taken in since 2011 when the totals were 3,382 in April and 3,809 in October.

According to Barton County Health Director Shelly Schneider, in Barton County last Month, the Barton County Sheriff’s Office received 175 pounds and over 300 pounds between its April and October drives. 

The Hoisington Police Department reported it gathered 26 pounds in October and 35 in April. This marked the first year for Hoisington to conduct such an event.

Nationally, the numbers are 900,386 in April and 912,305 in October this year. They were 376,593 and 377,086 in 2011.

“Safe storage and proper disposal are the keys to preventing the accidental or intentional misuse of medications,” Schmidt said. “Kansans continue to recognize the importance of safely disposing of their unused medicines during these semi-annual Drug Take-Back events. I appreciate the leadership of the DEA and local law enforcement agencies in providing this service for Kansans.”

Kansans have safely destroyed a total of 131,030 pounds of medications in the 14 collection days that have been held since 2010. Law enforcement agencies turn the drugs they collect over to the DEA, which safely destroys the medications.

Unused prescriptions can be turned in year-round at many local law enforcement locations. Kansans should contact their local sheriff’s office or police department for more information.

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